Tag Archives: cosleeping

Breastfeeding in the News: April 13th – 20th, 2010

Breastfeeding could save the US $13 billion dollars, US employers must now provide women with time and space to express their milk, even the new Adam Sandler flick features a four 48 month old child breastfeeding; it all sounds good, and then we find out that Enfamil now has a new flavored formula – chocolate, created especially for toddlers, and suddenly I want to crawl back into bed again. 

Melissa Bartick (chair of the Massachusetts Breastfeeding Coalition) had an impressive study published in Pediatrics recently.  Her figures show that in addition to saving the US $13 billion dollars in health care costs over 900 lives could be saved as well if breastfeeding rates were to meet US recommendations.  Her follow up article (“Peaceful Revolution”) calls for women to feel anger (rather than guilt) for the lack of support they receive.  Amie Newman however believes that it will take more than public policy and knowing about health care cost to get women on board.  Using herself as an example, she nursed her first child for a few days and her second for three years.  The only thing that had changed was her frame of mind.  While visiting Vermont’s only “Baby Friendly” hospital recently I had a conversation with their Lactation Consultant Terry Donofrio voiced similar concerns.  “It used to be that women chose breastfeeding as a lifestyle.  Today they choose it for health reasons but they don’t have the lifestyle to accommodate it,” says Terry.  I have to agree.   Having to go back to work before your baby has even started solids is not conducive to breastfeeding.  Nor is the new IPhone app that lets you keep track of every feed, and don’t even get me started on the number of mothers who are scared silly at the thought of taking their baby to bed with them.  We need a cultural change as well.

Thanks to Obama’s new health care package (“Thank you, page 1239!”) we now have a law guaranteeing mothers who work in a company with over 50 employees time and space to express their milk.  (Notice I didn’t say pump?  I’ve met mothers who work full time and hand express.  They were able to meet their baby’s need without any help from Medela, thank you very much!)  What we don’t know yet is how the law will be enforced, what a “reasonable” amount of space looks like, and whether or not women will get paid for their “lactation time”.  It’s a step in the right direction if the direction we want to go in is separating moms and babies.  I would have preferred a six month paid maternity leave, but beggars can’t be choosers.

In the medical news, there was an interesting Canadian study that showed that the negative effects of giving your children fast food can erase some of the positive benefits of breastfeeding (Higher asthma rates linked to fast food.)  The rise of celiac disease in Sweden in the 1980’s has been tied to the recommendation at the time to wait before weaning to introduce gluten.  Weaning was early in those days and the amounts of gluten recommended were high.  And how it was wonderful to see an article about reducing pain during vaccinations recommending that the baby breastfeed during the inoculation!  I will always remember the story Diane Bagley once told me about her daughter Leah.  Leah was a still a young nursing toddler when she fell and cut her finger.  After no one could her to hold her hand still at the ER Diane insisted that they let her nurse her while they stitched her up.  The staff watched in amazement as Leah held out her tiny hand and nursed until the stitches were complete. (Diane by the way is the graphic designer for the Massachusetts Breastfeeding Coalition – she did the wonderful “For All Walks of Life” campaign!)   

While we’re talking about medical advice, a study about advice given over the internet used breastfeeding as one of their topics found that only 200 out of 500 studied sites gave advice that was reliable  But as Alicia Huntley one of my Facebook friends pointed out  “ah, but what it the ‘right’ answer? Particularly on areas of controversy such as vaccination, or HIV and breastfeeding?”  That’s something to think about, but on the other hand just this week Parenting.com in an article about how to save money pointed out that breastfeeding is never really free and then encouraged mothers to ask their pediatrician for some of that free formula they always seem to have on hand.  Great….Another article wonders why there is so much cat fighting over parenting issues and breastfeeding in particular.  She wonders if parenting bloggers are really more polarized than political shock jocks or even sports commentators?

Last but not least will someone please explain to me what the big fuss is in Ohio?  A breastfeeding campaign that includes a billboard of a black baby with breast milk dribbling down his chin has upset quite a few folks.  Apparently it’s not the slogan (“Breast Milk Satisfies”) that has people upset.  It’s the idea of human milk on a baby’s chin that bothers them. “ Never mind how cute or attractive people find the “Got Milk” campaigns and the trademark milk mustaches. A baby with breast milk on its chin is disgusting, you know, because it came from a woman and not a cow. “  Like I said I just don’t get it.

And for those of you who have been wondering where I’ve been lately; two funerals, a speaking engagement (my talk “Going Baby Friendly in New England” went well thanks!), and a new dog have kept me busy.  The dog is a year old, she wasn’t house broken, and couldn’t do stairs.  She is a shelter dog with “issues”.  So far she has chewed through two leashes, the power cord to my lap top (twice), and her dog bed.  She has peed on the couch three times.  This is my first dog ever and I feel like a new mother who doesn’t know how to do anything right.  I’m sure the whole experience is going to make me a better lactation consultant – if I can only live through it!  (Did I mention we have five cats?)

As always I love to hear from you.

Kathy Abbott IBCLC
www.BusyMomsBreastfeed.com 

www.TheCuriousLactivist.Wordpress.com 

On Facebook:” Breastfeeding in the News”            

NEW Enfagrow™ PREMIUM™ Chocolate

A delicious new flavor for toddlers 12 months and older – with prebiotics for digestive health!

As your child grows from an infant to a toddler, he’s probably becoming pickier about what he eats. Now more than ever, ensuring that he gets complete nutrition can be a challenge

http://www.enfamil.com/app/iwp/enfamil/productDetail.do?dm=enf&id=-12781&iwpst=B2C&ls=0&csred=1&r=3449233698

The Burden of Suboptimal Breastfeeding in the United States: A Pediatric Cost Analysis

Framed another

way, the United States incurs $13 billion

in excess costs annually and suffers 911

preventable deaths per year because

our breastfeeding rates fall far below

medical recommendations. Substantial

gains could be made with exclusive

breastfeeding for 4 months and any

breastfeeding at 6 months.      

http://sz0155.wc.mail.comcast.net/service/home/~/Bartick%20Reinhold%202010.pdf?auth=co&loc=en_US&id=171920&part=2

Got Breast Milk? First We Need Equity (Aime Newman)

Turns out, breastfeeding a baby is not some secret society to which only some women hold the password. I breastfed my daughter for three years, enjoying (almost) every moment of it in a way I have never and certainly will never experience again. It had as much to do with my frame of mind as anything else.

Which is why solely focusing on public policy or solely focusing on the health benefits of breastfeeding or solely focusing on just trying to convince moms of how wonderful breastfeeding can be are not panaceas.

A study that finds that breastfeeding saves money and lives is not earth-shattering. But what we do with this information has the potential to be. From public spaces to workplaces, hospital rooms to women’s living rooms, society must expand its notion of what women need to feed their babies from birth and beyond.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/amie-newman/got-breast-milk-first-we_b_532424.html

Cat fight on the mom blog: Are we meaner than the sports blogs?

In a groundbreaking segment, the Today show figured out that Moms are mean to each other on parenting blogs. Shocking I know!! (They also pieced together like Sherlock Holmes that people trying to egg on others are called “trolls.”)

I also try to avoid breastfeeding/formula feeding whenever possible. You may not have noticed but I was a day late on that breastfeeding story last week because I just didn’t want to get into. I only used the story when I had the angle of how can we facilitate 90 percent breastfeeding instead of should 90 percent breastfeed. The facilitating discussion went really well. The other discussion would have gotten ugly!

http://blogs.ajc.com/momania/2010/04/13/cat-fight-on-the-mom-blog-are-we-meaner-than-the-sports-blogs/?cxntfid=blogs_momania

Internet advice may not be reliable for your kid’s health—study

Details of the study
For the study, the researchers used Google to seek facts about five conditions–HIV breastfeeding, mastitis breastfeeding (breastfeeding while the breast tissue is inflamed), baby sleeping

position along with green vomit and MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) and autism.

On observing the sites for child healthcare information, the researchers found that the type of guidance offered differed notably.

They also found that half of the search results were unable to answer the question typed.

The study also revealed that mere 200 out of 500 studied sites were able to offer accurate information and also that government-run websites were the only absolutely dependable source.

In other words, 39 percent of the 500 results gave accurate information while 11 percent gave the wrong answer; the most incorrect replies being given to search results regarding MMR and autism along with HIV and breastfeeding.

http://www.themedguru.com/20100413/newsfeature/internet-advice-may-not-be-reliable-your-kid-s-health-study-86133985.html

A BREASTFEEDING ROOM OF ONE’S OWN

A nifty provision in the healthcare bill is a boon to working moms

By Mary Elizabeth Williams

Thank you, page 1239! Deep within the new health care bill, right before the part where the Rostovs flee Moscow, there’s a neat provision that will thrill working mothers. CNN notes this week that companies with 50 or more employees are now required to provide “a place, other than a bathroom, that is shielded from view and free from intrusion from co-workers and the public, which may be used by an employee to express breast milk.” 

http://www.salon.com/life/broadsheet/2010/04/13/breastfeeding_rooms/   

Peaceful Revolution: Motherhood & the $13 Billion Dollar Guilt

Do you feel guilty for not breastfeeding? Or do you feel angry because it didn’t have to be this way?

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/melissa-bartick/ipeaceful-revolutioni-mot_b_536659.html

Higher asthma rates linked to fast food

The Canadians were puzzled: Could fast food override some of the benefits of breastfeeding?

Their study involved children born in Manitoba in 1995. The team looked at 246 children, aged eight to 10, diagnosed with asthma, and 477 children without asthma. Parents filled out questionnaires that asked, among other things, “how often has your child eaten burgers or fast food in the last week” and “when did your child first have any formula/cow’s milk?”

Children who ate fast foods more than once or twice a week — more than half the children studied — were almost twice as likely to have asthma.

Children who were breastfed exclusively for more than three months had a lower risk of asthma. But the association disappeared in kids who ate fast food frequently, compared to those who occasionally or rarely consumed fast food.

http://www.windsorstar.com/health/Higher+asthma+rates+linked+fast+food/1226588/story.html

Save on the Top 3 New-Baby Expenses (parenting.com)

COST SAVING STRATEGIES ESSNETIAL FOR KEEPING YOUR FAMILY’S BABY BUDGET IN CHECK DURING YOUR CHILD’S FIRST YEAR.

By Rachel Grumman, Babytalk

Eating Up the Budget

 Formula costs a minimum of $1,500 the first year, according to Bradford — more if you use one that’s gluten-free or contains prebiotics. Although breastfeeding is less expensive, “there’s a fallacy that breastfeeding is free,” says Bradford. A breast pump can run $250 to $300, then there’s nursing bras, pads, and breast milk freezer bags. How to save: Pediatricians often have free formula samples, notes Sandberg. Also, sign up for coupons at the formula company’s website. If you’re breastfeeding, “buy breast pads and freezer bags month-to-month and finish them before buying another,” says Bradford. “Women often don’t know how long they’ll breastfeed and supplies are expensive.” Also, rather than buying the 2- to 4-ounce baby bottles that you’ll only use for a few months, buy the 8-ounce bottles, which have greater longevity.

http://www.parenting.com/article/Mom/Work–Family/Save-on-the-Top-3-New-Baby-Expenses

Adam Sandler’s “Grown Ups”

Breastfeeding a four year old. Ick! Ptoeey! Gross! Yup, this film is going to make money.”

http://bighollywood.breitbart.com/jjmnolte/2010/04/16/new-trailer-adam-sandlers-grown-ups/

Quick steps to lessen pain to your baby

  1. Let the medical assistant offer the injection at this point while you are breastfeeding.  You can also switch the baby to a pacifier.
  2.  No talking throughout or after the injection until the baby stops crying.  Whether or not there is crying do the next step.
  1. Offer the baby breast milk.  Remember the endorphins effect.  Or if you don’t breastfeed, offer the baby the pacifier.  Continue not talking.  Begin doing the next step.

 

http://www.officialwire.com/main.php?action=posted_news&rid=130634http://www.officialwire.com/main.php?action=posted_news&rid=130634

Companies must soon provide private space for mothers to pump breast milk: Health Care Fact Check

Lactation-room requirements will take effect as soon as the Labor Department lays out some basic rules in the coming months. Until then, there are several uncertainties about the law, according to law firms, trade associations and advocates of breastfeeding.

For one, the provision says mothers must be given a “reasonable” amount of time to lactate, without defining what is reasonable.

The law also says employees do not have to be paid for work during their lactation time. That could cause confusion, because it is contrary to the existing Fair Labor Standards Act mandate “that employers pay employees for breaks of less than 20 minutes,” according to a primer on the new law by Jackson Lewis.

It’s also unclear how the law will be enforced, although the Labor Department should provide guidance on that, says Gina Ciagne, director of breastfeeding and consumer relations at Lansinoh Laboratories, a manufacturer of lactation supplies.

For employers, the law could raise other practical concerns. Retailers with small stores might have to give up sales space for lactation rooms. The law does not specify the size but says the place may not be a bathroom and must be private, shielded from view and free from intrusion from co-workers and the public.

Asked if employers are scratching their heads over all this, DeFilippis said it’s too soon because “I think that most employers probably aren’t aware of it.”

http://www.cleveland.com/medical/index.ssf/2010/04/companies_must_soon_provide_pr.html

Celiac Disease and Breastfeeding – The Missing Link

Celiac disease became a rising epidemic in Sweden in the mid 1980’s. The influx of celiac patients under 2 years old was cause for concern, considering neighboring countries were seeing a decline in celiac patients during that same time period. The Swedish celiac epidemic pattern was eventually correlated to the new dietary guidelines, which as a result of the study, were later changed. The initial dietary guidelines mandated that infants were to be introduced to gluten only after they were weaned from breastfeeding, and larger amounts of gluten were given to the infants during this time.

The recommended age is older than 4 months of age, but younger than 7 months.  It is also recommended to introduce gluten gradually, in small amounts and while your child is still nursing.

http://www.celiac.com/articles/22092/1/Celiac-Disease-and-Breastfeeding—The-Missing-Link/Page1.html

Ohio Billboard Promotes Breastfeeding, Offends Some

The billboard in question features a young child with a little bit of milk dripping out of its mouth and the slogan “Breast milk satisfies.” The kid looks pretty satisifed so far as one can tell from a staged photo. There are no bare breasts in sight, so what’s everyone finding so offensive about this ad? Apparently, it’s the fact that the milk coming out of the baby’s mouth is breast milk.

Never mind how cute or attractive people find the “Got Milk” campaigns and the trademark milk mustaches. A baby with breast milk on its chin is disgusting, you know, because it came from a woman and not a cow.

http://www.clevelandleader.com/node/13682

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Filed under breastfeeding, Breastfeeding in the News, the curious lactivist

Breastfeeding in the News: Dec. 8th – Dec. 14, 2009

Hello All,                                                                

Good news! Reality TV star Kourtney Kardashian plans to breastfeed for five years! Well it sounds great until she explains why.  “I’m so excited,” said Kourtney to her sister, “I won’t have to cook for five years!” Sorry Kourtney, I hate to be the one to break this to you but if extended breastfeeding meant no cooking every mother in the country would still be suckling her teenagers!  In other celebrity news actress Vera Farmiga tells us what it was like to be breastfeeding while filming “Up in the Air” with George Clooney.   “She had to take nursing breaks while filming — especially during love scenes!…“I’ll tell you what it was like when we locked lips,” Vera reveals. “We’d do it and then I’d say, ‘OK, George, now I’ve got to go breastfeed.’ Then I’d come back and be trying to find sort of clever positions to hide the wet spots on my silk blouse.”  People are also asking if former Playboy model Kendra Wilkinson breasts implants will prevent her from breastfeeding.  As gossipy as it may sound, the article includes a good overview on how implants can affect the female anatomy.

 In New York the Rochester Business Alliance has expressed dismay that the new Health Care bill in Washington includes provisions to support the needs of lactating mothers in the workplace. In their esteemed opinion such an act “has nothing to do with reforming health care”.  According to an Alliance spokesperson, “What they’re doing now is just shifting costs. They’re doing nothing to change the delivery of health care… They’re doing nothing to address why health care costs are escalating.”

A “Paradigm shift”.  That’s what they are calling the latest approach to newborn care in the Philippines.  Not only will breastfeeding be initiated in the first hour, skin to skin contact will begin before the umbilical cord is cut, and the first bath will be delayed 8 hours.  Following the ENC (essential newborn care) guidelines put forth by the World Health Organization hospital staff are beginning to embrace these simple life saving measures.  Sometimes I think we here in the US would rather pay more for expensive medical treatment that makes us look “advanced” than to admit that “simplicity” saves lives.  A study in Nigeria provides another example where “simplicity” triumphs over technology.  Women who were allowed to bring a companion of their choice into the labor room were found to initiate breastfeeding sooner than those who were alone.  All the high tech resources in the world can’t compete with the loving touch of a caring companion.

‘We Go Into the Bush to Collect Herbs’  (my favorite story of the week) takes a look at pro & cons of moving birth away from the village and into the hospital.  The woman being interviewed tells how during her first three births she was surrounded by experienced women and that she never “experienced any difficulty or complication during or after labour.”  On the other hand it was her belief that “it was an abomination to give a baby the poisonous milk that comes immediately after delivery” and “in keeping with her tradition, the first thing to be given to the new born baby should be water and nothing else.”  While I applaud her government’s effort to debunk the myths surrounding colostrum (By the way, can anyone shed any light on why so many cultures shun colostrum?  To me it seems so counter intuitive to human survival.), the breastfeeding instructions that she is given in the hospital really worry me.  “…the breastfeeding mother needs to sit in an upright position while placing her child on a breast, which is expected to last for about 15 to 20 minutes, before the child could be transferred to the other breast. By so doing the child would have sufficient time to suckle the necessary ingredients contained in the breast milk. This is contrary to the traditional practice that was characterized by indiscriminate placement and transfer of a child from one breast to another, by the nursing mothers.”  Teaching her to watch the clock instead of the baby is not only counter intuitive it is also impractical in any rural village.  And why does she have to be upright?! 

 While we’re talking about Africa, there is a new HIV study that looks at HIV-exposed but uninfected children (which is about 40% of the babies born to HIV-infected mothers in Southern Africa) and concludes that exclusive breastfeeding significantly improved their long-term health.  “Being undernourished is predictive of death. Infant feeding patterns affect growth; the mean weight of children who are breastfed is greater than most children who are formula-fed during the first half of infancy. Breastfed HIV-infected infants had higher scores for weight for age than those who were not, in particular during the first six weeks of life—a difference of 130 grammes for male children and 110 grammes for female children.” It is heartening to know that not all babies born to HIV-infected mothers will be infected, and that just like normal babies, they too will benefit from exclusive breastfeeding. 

An interesting study done in Boston looked at the affect of religion on breastfeeding. Christians, Sikhs, and Muslims are more likely to stop breastfeeding before 24 months than Hindu mothers.  Researchers made a note that there is nothing in these religions that will explain early termination of breastfeeding therefore it has to be cultural factors and norms.” 

I’m not sure what to make of the new study from Finland claiming that waiting until 6 months to introduce foods actually increases the risk of food allergies.  According to these researchers “Late introduction of potatoes, rye, meat, and fish was significantly associated with sensitization to any inhaled allergen. Egg allergy was associated with late introduction of potatoes, carrots, cabbages, oats, wheat, rye, meat, fish, and eggs, while wheat allergy was related to late introduction of potatoes, wheat, rye, fish, and eggs.” 

But I think it’s important to note that “In the study, mothers breastfed for a median of 1.8 months, and the median age at the introduction of the first solid food was 3.5 months”.  I’m not the only one who has doubts, according to Dr. Zuo in Cincinnati the study was also” limited by using food sensitivity but not food allergy as an outcome for the study.”I am not supporting the conclusion of this article,” Zuo said in an e-mail. “But I support the concept that late introduction of solid foods may not protect children from allergic diseases and I also support early solid food introduction for many children not at high risk for allergic reaction.” Zuo added that the topic is hotly debated by allergists, and believes the “answer to increased allergic diseases is not [based] on the timing of solid food introduction, but something that happens earlier.”

According to the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) the introduction of processed cereal based foods between 4 and 6 months does not impose a health risk.  This of course conflicts with the World Health Organization’s recommendations of delaying food for six months and opens the gates for formula companies marketing their infant cereals, which right now is a booming market place. 

A recent March of Dimes poll found that more moms worry that the stress they are under will affect their baby’s health than worried about the actual pain of childbirth. Only 60 percent worried that they wouldn’t be able to breastfeed successfully. 71% worried that their baby would be born prematurely.

According to Kathi Barber founder of the African-American Breastfeeding Alliance the disparity in breastfeeding rates for African-Americans “is so great it transcends socio-economics”  And in fact it can be traced back to the days of slavery when wet nursing for whites was part of the enforced social contract between slave and master.  (Thanks to Lisa Purro for sending me this article!)

A new study found that the number of babies being put to bed on their backs seemed has leveled off since 2001.  A doctor’s recommendation, fear that the baby might choke, and concern for the baby’s comfort were the top three deciding factors.  But “…between 2003-2007, only 53.6 percent reported that their doctors had advised them to put their babies on their backs only.” They also point out that “ A greater proportion of African-American infants than white or Hispanic infants die from SIDS each year”  The article went to recommend that one should “Think about using a clean, dry pacifier when placing your infant down to sleep, but don’t force the baby to take it. (If you’re breastfeeding, wait until your child is 1 month old, or is used to breastfeeding before using a pacifier.”) 

While we’re on the subject of sleep in Shunning the Family Bed. Who Benefits Most?” Dr. Jay Gordan says “The medical profession, as it often does, is approaching the entire idea of the family bed backward. A baby in the same bed with his or her parents is surrounded by the best possible surveillance and safety system. It must be the responsibility of the manufacturers and proponents of cribs and separated sleep to prove that such disruption is safe, not the other way around.”   

In Ask Mr. Dad: The joys of sleep deprivation” the author warns I’m sure you tried to prepare yourself for all the changes. But there’s a difference between watching a tornado on TV and having one blow the roof off your house. Now that your baby is actually here, it’s pretty obvious that nothing could have fully prepped you for the daily (and nightly) challenges of living with a newborn.”  He goes on to add that the man’s wife might be experiencing a case of “baby blues” “And the fact that she’s breastfeeding on demand – and is experiencing the exhaustion that goes along with it – just makes things worse.” 

Also the UK mania for lists has been noted for its downside. In addition to “hospitals good at caring for the dying get marked down because people die there,…a small maternity hospital is closed because the acute hospital is more “productive”, but ask the actual mothers cared for at the little hospital, and you find that their rates of breastfeeding and health are higher, of depression lower.

Remember when everyone was up in arms because Facebook was removing photos of breastfeeding mothers?  According to  Barry Schnitt (FB’s director of policy communications) ‘The majority of the photos removed were of completely nude women (posing in mirrors or bathtubs) who happened to involve a baby eating lunch.  Another misnomer is that the company was employing people to blindly click through pictures in search of breasts to flag for removal. “We only act on things that are reported to us,” Schnitt said “So, if your au naturel pose gets zapped, blame a friend.” 

That’s it for now. I hope your holiday was as good as mine! It was just a year ago today that I first joined Facebook.  To my great surprise I now have over 650 friends!  Thank you all for keeping me connected to the world of women, birth, and babies.  As always I love hearing from you.

Kathy Abbott, IBCLC 

www.BusyMomsBreastfeed.com

On Facebook: “Breastfeeding in the News” 

My Blog:  http://TheCuriousLactivist.wordpress.com/

 

 

List mania is the besetting folly of our age.

Oh dear. A golden rule for life is that that there are some things you don’t put down on paper. Ever. The nation’s weary couch-potatoes woke yesterday to a gust of shocked hilarity, as somebody leaked a BBC document fussily labelled “Knowledge Commissioning Graded Talent List”. It puts TV presenters under “Top Tier Highly Valued”, “Mid-range average appeal”, “On the way up” and — at this point the reader falls off the chair, helpless with glee — “Occasional sparkle but limited appeal”.

The mad list is interesting, though, as a symptom of a wider phenomenon: list-mania and tabulation fever has been the besetting folly of the Noughties. Government adores its faulty league tables of schools, universities, hospitals and local authority services. Instead of intelligent inspection and help, billions of pounds and years of effort are poured into lists and tables that serve little purpose. They demoralise some, make others smug, and condition thousands of managers to work to targets that skew and corrupt their core mission. Gradual growth, local adaptation and interesting initiatives are stifled: hospitals good at caring for the dying get marked down because people die there, schools that deal valiantly with problem estates get slammed as “failing”.

Meanwhile subtler indicators are ignored. A small maternity hospital is closed because the acute hospital is more “productive”, but ask the actual mothers cared for at the little hospital, and you find that their rates of breastfeeding and health are higher, of depression lower. The same principle applies to the elderly who lose rural cottage hospitals and become more, not less, dependent. In every area, formulaic paperwork outranks sense.

You can see why. Lists and tables make managers feel safe, as if life and a happy society were a science, not an art. Given enough lists, they hope for a formula. But in reality, league tables mainly appeal to a judgmental, talent-show mentality. They work fine in sport — a goal is a goal — and book sales or cinema tickets are countable. In subtler fields of effort they are often worse than worthless.  At least daffy media lists have no power (with luck, neither does the BBC bêtise). But they should be mocked, because they only encourage government itself in its damaging love of fruitless, phantom tidiness in an imaginary paper world.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/comment/article6955233.ece

Teaching Black Women To Embrace Breast-Feeding

African-American moms have the lowest rates of all — by some measures, they are half as likely to nurse as whites and Hispanics

When Kathi Barber gave birth a decade ago, she was the first in her family in generations to nurse, and was dumbfounded to realize she had no role models. Barber became obsessed with encouraging nursing among black moms, as numerous studies show that exclusive breast-feeding can reduce a baby’s chances of developing diabetes, obesity, ear infections and respiratory illness. Yet Barber was frustrated that for many new mothers, their only image of this age-old act may come from a museum or a National Geographic documentary. “Tribal women, with elongated breasts, earrings and tribal jewelry. And let’s say we’re trying to promote that to a 25-year-old, mmm …” she laughs. “I don’t think that’s going to do the trick.”

So Barber founded the African-American Breastfeeding Alliance and wrote The Black Woman’s Guide to Breastfeeding. As a lactation consultant, she travels the country putting on workshops and training sessions, and encouraging hospitals and family clinics to reach out to this community.

In fact, the older, more educated and higher-income a mother is, the more likely she is to breast-feed. But experts say the disparity for African-Americans is so great it transcends socio-economics.

Barber says work is clearly a huge barrier, and black moms may be more likely to hold lower-wage jobs with no breaks allowed for nursing. African-Americans have also had to earn money since long before the women’s liberation movement.

In fact, Barber thinks you can trace part of the problem all the way back to the breakup of families under slavery, and the enduring, negative image of so-called mammies — slaves made to serve as wet nurses for their master’s white children.

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=121755349

Coordinator promotes breast feeding

Kelly Sibley is in charge of promoting one of the best ways to keep newborn babies healthy, a practice in which Oregon leads the nation Sibley, 52, is the breast feeding program coordinator for Oregon Division of Public Health. She lives in Portland.

Q: Has Oregon implemented any public policies that have helped successfully promote breast feeding?

A: We have a law that protects a mother’s right to breast feed in public. We also have a law to protect breast feeding in the workplace, so mom who are returning to work are provided a clean and private place to express her milk.

Q: Is there anything else that has helped make Oregon get so far ahead of the curve when it comes to breast feeding?

A: I don’t think we’re totally clear about why we are so far ahead. I think for Oregon, breast feeding is seen as normal, more normal than it’s seen in other places. You are walking in a park and you look over and you see a mom on a bench and she’s breast feeding, it’s more likely to be accepted as normal here. She’s more likely to get a smile or just be left alone. In other places, she might be asked to leave or asked to go into the bathroom. I say, how would you feel if someone asked you to eat your lunch in the bathroom?

http://www.statesmanjournal.com/article/20091214/NEWS/912140315/1001/news

Samantha Harris On Managing Motherhood, Career

After welcoming her daughter in 2007, Samantha Harris learned all too quickly that it often takes a village to raise a child….The juggling of her career — including her cohosting responsibilities on Dancing With the Stars, a correspondent for The Insider, and cohosting Entertainment Tonight Weekend — began only three weeks after delivering her daughter Josselyn Sydney when Samantha returned to the DWtS set….With baby girl at home with the nanny, the new mama arrived to work with her pump in hand!..“I was breastfeeding so I was pumping again and again throughout the production day and right before I went on stage because we didn’t want to have any mishaps in a gown — on live television!” she tells Working Mother.

http://celebrity-babies.com/2009/12/12/samantha-harris-on-managing-motherhood-career/

Vera Farmiga Says Family of Three Is ‘Inseparable’

In her new film Up in the Air, Vera Farmiga portrays corporate executive and frequent-flyer obsessed Alex, a love interest for George Clooney. Although in real life she’s married to musician Renn Hawkey of Deadsy and mom to 11-month-old Fynn,…With Vera’s busy career, Renn and Fynn are often along for the ride as she films on location. “My husband and I have made a pact,” she explains. “We are inseparable. He and my son just come along. I can’t handle it alone. I don’t like it when they’re not with me. I need them.”…Calling childbirth “just an incredible gift,” Vera, 36, says that motherhood both helped and hindered her approach to the role. “I never felt so empowered, so powerful, so womanly as I did after I gave birth,” she shares. “I felt more feminine than I ever had in my life. So I just rode that wave.”…At the same time — as a breastfeeding mom — Vera says that she had to take nursing breaks while filming — especially during love scenes!…“I’ll tell you what it was like when we locked lips,” Vera reveals. “We’d do it and then I’d say, ‘OK, George, now I’ve got to go breastfeed.’ Then I’d come back and be trying to find sort of clever positions to hide the wet spots on my silk blouse.”…There were also hormones to contend with, and Vera admits “I got very tired at times and, God knows, there were a lot of tears.”…Regardless, she says she had no reservations about accepting the role — or stepping into motherhood….“The birth was going to be close to the start of filming and it was my first child–but, I come from a family of seven children. I was always very comfortable changing diapers. I felt confident that I’d be fine as a first time mother. I said to [director] Jason [Reitman], ‘This is a great creative opportunity and I could use a paycheck.’”

http://celebrity-babies.com/2009/12/11/vera-farmiga-says-family-of-three-is-inseparable/

Study Links Factors to Choice of Infant Sleep Position

Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health have identified three principal factors linked to whether caregivers place infants to sleep on their backs. Those three factors are: whether they received a physician’s recommendation to place infants only on their backs for sleep, fear that the infant might choke while sleeping on the back, and concerns for an infant’s comfort while sleeping on the back.

The survey also found that after increasing steadily, the proportion of infants placed to sleep on their backs leveled off in the years since 2001.

A greater proportion of African-American infants than white or Hispanic infants die from SIDS each year

In the study, the researchers reported that between 2003-2007, only 53.6 percent reported that their doctors had advised them to put their babies on their backs only.

Always place babies on their backs to sleep — Infants who sleep on their backs are less likely to die of SIDS than babies who sleep on their stomachs or sides. Placing your baby on his or her back to sleep is the number one way to reduce the risk of SIDS.
Use the back sleep position every time — Infants who usually sleep on their backs but who are then placed on their stomachs, like for a nap, are at very high risk for SIDS. So it is important for babies to sleep on their backs every time, for naps and at night.
Place your baby on a firm sleep surface, such as a safety-approved crib mattress covered with a fitted sheet — Never place an infant to sleep on a pillow, quilt, sheepskin, or other soft surface. Information on crib safety and regulatory requirements for infant cribs is available from the Consumer Product Safety Commission at http://www.cpsc.gov/info/cribs/index.html.
Keep soft objects, toys, and loose bedding out of an infant’s sleep area – Don’t use pillows, blankets, quilts, sheepskins, or pillow-like bumpers in your baby’s sleep area. Keep all items away from the infant’s face.
Avoid letting your baby overheat during sleep – Dress your infant in light sleep clothing and keep the room at a temperature that is comfortable for an adult.

Think about using a clean, dry pacifier when placing your infant down to sleep, but don’t force the baby to take it. ( If you’re breastfeeding, wait until your child is 1 month old, or is used to breastfeeding before using a pacifier. )
In addition to Dr. Colson, other authors of the study were Denis Rybin, Theodore Colton and Michael J. Corwin of Boston University; Lauren Smith, of the Massachusetts Department of Public Health; and George Lister, of University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas.

http://media-newswire.com/release_1107902.html

Cut the crude commentary about breastfeeding moms

By Ruth Butler | The Grand Rapids Press

Seriously?

A proposed bill to help mothers feed their babies is giving people fits? I guess folks would prefer mothers with babies stay home – drapes closed, if possible – until the child is old enough to scarf burgers at Mickey Ds the way God intended. Isn’t that, after all, why he created formula via his humble servant Justus von Liebig in 1867? (Thanks, Wiki.)

Whether the bill protecting a mother’s right to breastfeed in public passes through the state House has become secondary. What’s appalling is the reaction of those who are a) offended and/or b) driven to crude commentaries at the prospect of moms offering nutrition to children – the ones who are America’s future and the crux of every really important protest. Cue the “What About the Children?” chorus.

Everyone needs to calm down and accept breasts make people crazy. They are sexual, they are signs of womanhood (ask any 12-year-old girl – or boy.)

They are – insert giggle here – titillating.

Yet, I’ve never met a nursing mother who viewed feeding time with her child as an equivalent to foreplay or exhibitionism.

Sure, those who think mothers caught with a hungry child in public should do it in private – ever eaten your lunch in a bathroom stall? – also claim to have seen examples of flashing during the meal. But having been one, and seen many more nursing mothers, I testify most women are discreet. They cover themselves and focus on the wonderful task at hand, rather than take feeding time as a chance to put it out there for evaluation.

Where are the howls of protest for women who do just that? Why do you think they call it Hooters? Because only wise old owls eat there? Isn’t more being offered than what’s on the menu, in a look-don’t-touch sort of way?

Seriously. Strut your stuff at the beach, on the dance floor, in situations where cleavage is expected. But feeding time? It’s among the least sexual moments of a human’s life.

The only sexual thing going on at nursing time is in the minds of others. Making it their, not the mother’s, problem. Unless, of course, she’s kicked out of a building or the police are called (Google Target, breastfeeding.)

Of course, we could follow the example of other countries that see this and other ways women weave their seductive webs as way too provocative.

Burkas all around! Cover the hair, the lips, the body. Save the weak from themselves.

Seriously.

http://www.mlive.com/living/grand-rapids/index.ssf/2009/12/column_cut_the_crude_commentar.html

Recently, police were called on a complaint about a breastfeeding mother in a Harper Woods store. Here’s what local moms had to say.

“The people at Target were being stupid and by calling the police they made this into a bigger issue than it needed to be. I feel bad for the woman and her husband at being called out and embarassed for doing something completely normal! It was uncalled for and ridiculous!”— CinderMomma

“There is always more to the story I think but unlike the last incident which took place in a restaurant (a completely different scenario) I can’t imagine what the issue would be. I have seen women breastfeeding in the mall (at least I assume they were since they were discreet) and really who would care? Unless…..things got loud?”— Coco958

“If you are breast feeding a four week old infant in an aisle at Target you are a poor parent…period.”— paf

“if you’re bf’ing IN THE AISLE, (a) you’re probably blocking aisle traffic, (b) it ain’t the best positioning for the kid, (c) it ain’t the safest way to assure yourself and those around you that your boob won’t accidentally “unfurl” so to speak. Not saying kids shouldn’t be fed, but it ain’t all about you and your boob and your baby. There ARE other people who are actually shopping too ya know.”— shaari

http://www.freep.com/article/20091213/FEATURES01/912130336/1026/Features01/Recently-police-were-called-on-a-complaint-about-a-breastfeeding-mother-in-a-Harper-Woods-store.-Heres-what-local-moms-had-to-say.-Todays-topic

Someone Needs To Explain Babies To Kourtney! 

Before one crawls out of her vagina and is thrusted into a world where his mother thinks she should be breastfeeding until the kid is five.  FIVE?! Gross!

http://perezhilton.com/2009-12-11-someone-needs-to-explain-babies-to-kourtney

Can Kendra Wilkinson breast-feed her baby even though she has implants?

Former Playboy model and reality TV star Kendra Wilkinson, wife of Indianapolis Colts wide receiver Hank Baskett, gave birth to a boy Friday morning. During her pregnancy, Wilkinson announced her intention to nurse her child despite having breast implants. Do implants affect a mother’s ability to breast-feed?

Generally, no. Most women who get breast implants, whether made of saline or silicone, can go on to breast-feed. But some types of breast augmentation surgery are more likely than others to result in complications when it comes to nursing. The two most common methods of implantation are peri-areolar incision (slicing just below the nipple) and inframammary incision (slicing along the crease below the breast). Cutting around the areola, the dark circle of skin surrounding the nipple, is much more likely to interfere with the network of nerves, glands, and milk ducts located toward the front of the breast that produce and carry milk to the nipple. Cutting underneath the breast allows the surgeon to circumvent that whole system rather than going straight through it. If a woman wants to breastfeed after getting implants, doctors usually recommend inframammary procedure, or an alternative route of insertion like the underarm or the belly button. Some doctors, however, still favor the peri-areolar technique because it allows for more precision when placing the implant and can produce less noticeable scarring. (Other considerations for which procedure to get include breast size, pain, and risk of the implants hardening.)

… The likelihood of nursing problems also depends on where, exactly, the surgeon places the implant. Subglandular placement—behind the mammary glands but in front of the chest muscles—has a higher risk of breastfeeding complications. That’s because the tissue surrounding the implant is more likely to harden when it’s in that position, which can make nursing difficult or painful. (The advantage is that the operation itself is quick and relatively painless.) The alternative is to slip the implant behind the chest muscle, separating the balloon from the lactation system entirely. This procedure is more common and generally better for breastfeeding. The downside of submuscular placement is that it’s more painful—the doctor has to fidget with the muscle itself—and it takes longer after surgery for the implant to “drop” into a more natural-looking position.

Implants could also interfere with nursing if they’re too big compared with the amount of skin and tissue surrounding them. Lactation proceeds most smoothly when the mother’s milk-producing lobes—arranged around the center of the breast—have room to expand and contract. If an implant puts too much pressure on the lobes, that can reduce the amount of milk generated

http://www.slate.com/id/2238096/

Social support during childbirth as a catalyst for early breastfeeding initiation for first-time Nigerian Mothers

Initiation of breastfeeding can be difficult in a busy maternity centre with inadequate manpower and social support. This study aims to explore the role of psychosocial support offered by companions on breastfeeding initiation among first-time mothers.  Methods: This is a secondary data analysis of a randomised controlled trial conducted among women attending the antenatal clinic of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria in 2007.  Those in the experimental group were asked to bring someone of their choice to the labour room to act as a companion; the comparison group received standard care. The results of 209 HIV negative women who had vaginal births were analysed.

The main outcome measure was time to initiation of breastfeeding after childbirth.

Results: Of the total, 94 had companions during labour while 115 did not have a companion. The median time to breastfeeding initiation was significantly shorter in those with companions compared to controls (16 vs.54 minutes; p <0.01). The cumulative survival analysis indicated that all in the treatmentgroup had initiated breastfeeding by 26 minutes, while among the control group none had commenced at 30 minutes post-delivery with some as late as 12 hours.

Conclusion: Use of companions during labour is associated with earlier time to breastfeeding initiation among first-time mothers in Nigeria

http://7thspace.com/headlines/328403/social_support_during_childbirth_as_a_catalyst_for_early_breastfeeding_initiation_for_first_time_nigerian_mothers.html

Breastfeeding Provision in Senate Bill Causes Controversy 

The Senate health care reform bill is more than 2,000 pages long. One of the provisions, a provision on page 1,239, is being applauded by new mothers. But business owners are asking what it has to do with any real reform.

The Rochester Business Alliance says its members are not against providing this kind of benefit to new mothers, but they say adding it to the Senate bill is wrong because it has nothing to do reforming health care.  MY fear is that throwing in things is just going to add costs,” says Sandy Parker of the Rochester Business Alliance. “What they’re doing now is just shifting costs. They’re doing nothing to change the delivery of health care… They’re doing nothing to address why health care costs are escalating.”

Those who support this bill say employers do benefit. Mothers with healthy infants take less time off of work and have less stress. The cost of these rooms is paid for in the first year alone.

In a survey, Rochester business owners say the want to continue to provide insurance benefits but only if they can get relief from escalating premiums.

The bottom line is that the bill keeps adding requirements for employers without  providing that relief.

http://www.13wham.com/news/local/story/Breastfeeding-Provision-in-Senate-Bill-Causes/lqyWY3b7MUintrfUeNQyUw.cspx

Infants without HIV suffer no growth check, despite maternal infection

Exclusive breastfeeding, however, significantly improved the long-term health of children born to HIV-infected mothers, lending further support to the recently revised World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines on infant feeding.

Being undernourished is predictive of death as well as poor early development in low- and middle- income countries where HIV is prevalent.

Infant feeding patterns affect growth; the mean weight of children who are breastfed is greater than most children who are formula-fed during the first half of infancy.

Of importance in these findings is the fact that HIV-exposed but uninfected children had a growth rate as good as that of the reference group. The authors note this is significant for two reasons:

  • Of the approximately 40% of infants born to HIV-infected mothers in Southern Africa most will be exposed but uninfected. While important, the growth and development of these children is often ignored.

 

Breastfed HIV-infected infants had higher scores for weight for age than those who were not, in particular during the first six weeks of life—a difference of 130 grammes for male children and 110 grammes for female children.

And, in line with recent WHO recommendations, they conclude: “These finding strengthen the recommendations of exclusive breastfeeding for HIV-infected women in resource-poor settings, for long-term child health.”

http://www.aidsmap.com/en/news/85CD7329-BD69-49E6-BEEE-9BA792BA6BBF.asp

A paradigm shift in newborn care
(The Philippine Star)

We’ve seen it portrayed in movies. A baby is delivered. It is held upside down and spanked. The umbilical cord is clamped and cut, and the baby is whisked away to be washed and cleaned immediately. Wrong!

Washing should be postponed until eight hours after birth,” said Dr. Aleli Sudiacal of the Department of Health (DOH) at a forum held recently at the Quirino Memorial Medical Center in Quezon City.

Aware of the need to raise the quality of post-natal care in health facilities, the World Health Organization (WHO), in partnership with the DOH, is promoting a new approach where evidence-based components are integrated in post-natal care. Called the Essential Newborn Care (ENC), this simple set of proven intervention can save the lives of newborns.

The new protocol is to postpone washing and instead, dry the baby immediately, within the first 30 seconds, and initiate skin-to-skin contact with the mother before clamping the umbilical cord. Breastfeeding should also be initiated within the first hour of birth.

“It’s a major paradigm shift,” said Dr. Honorata Catibog, head of the DOH Task Force on the Rapid Reduction of Maternal and Neonatal Mortality.

“Studies showed delayed breastfeeding by one day increases by 2.6-fold the risk of death due to infection,” said Dr. Asuncion Silvestre, head of the PGH Lactation Unit and Milk Bank. 

“Before, the focus was on pre-natal care, with the practice of at least four pre-natal visits. But essential newborn care actually starts even before the mother gets pregnant

. It starts with the status of the health of the woman,” Silvestre said. “All pregnancies are considered at high risk. We advocate facility-based delivery attended by skilled health professionals.”

“We practice the team approach involving doctor, nurse, and midwife,” said Dr. Bella Vitangcol who led the familiarization tour of the essential newborn care facilities at the Quirino Memorial Medical Center, a pioneer in newborn care

http://www.philstar.com/Article.aspx?articleId=530921&publicationSubCategoryId=75

Baby Dies Aboard United Airways Flight: A Response

Pardon me for quarreling with the experts, but this mother is being blamed for falling asleep? On a transatlantic flight? With a 4-week-old?

What nursing mother hasn’t fallen asleep while nursing her child? Back before the days of studies and guidelines and research and panels, back when the experts were primarily mothers, most women probably fell asleep every night while nursing their children. Many still do. But we’re not supposed to, because sleeping while holding a baby is taboo right now, along with letting babies sleep on their stomachs, or using forward-facing car seats, or feeding babies honey before age one.

We have expert-approved guidelines for every possible aspect of child-rearing, and I appreciate the insight afforded by such guidelines. But I wonder if they make it easier to blame parents when the unthinkable happens. The recommendations are ever-increasing and ever-changing, and that’s not even getting into the fact that on most issues, experts disagree. Parents are stumbling under the weight of all these “shoulds,” and when tragedy strikes, these recommendations morph into pointing fingers of accusation.

http://blog.christianitytoday.com/women/2009/12/baby_dies_aboard_united_airway.html

Breastfeeding for 5 years?

Kourtney Kardashian plans to breastfeed for five years.

The US reality star is expecting her first child, a boy, with partner Scott Disick later this month. Her sister Khloe has revealed Kourtney was initially clueless about what motherhood would entail, and expected to have to breastfeed until her son started school.

“Kourtney was like ‘I’m so excited, I don’t have to cook for five years,’ ” Khloe said. “And I go, ‘What do you mean?’ She’s like, ‘I’m gonna breastfeed.’ I go, ‘For five years?’ She has, like, no idea!”

Kourtney’s other sister Kim added she never thought of her 30-year-old sibling as maternal. She claims Kourtney has always been afraid of children, and done everything in her power to steer clear of them.

Kim said on The Rachel Ray Show: “Kourtney was never ever the type that I ever would think would ever want to have kids. She owns a kid’s clothing store, and if a kid would come in she would be like, ‘Where’s your mom? You need to go find your mom and come in with her.’ She didn’t understand it and she wasn’t that nurturing.”

http://entertainment.iafrica.com/news/2104660.htm

Ask Mr. Dad: The joys of sleep deprivation

Dear Mr. Dad: Our son is 3 weeks old and my wife is exhausted from breastfeeding. I have to be out of the house early in the morning to make it to work, but I do help her out between 2 a.m. and 4 a.m. But when I try to get a little sleep before or after those hours, or if I’m too slow to wake up, she’ll say to our son things like “Daddy doesn’t care.” This hurts my feelings because I’m doing as much as I can, and I do have to put in an eight-hour day in the office. How do I handle this situation?

I’m sure that everyone you knew tried to warn you that becoming a dad would turn your life upside down, right? And I’m sure you tried to prepare yourself for all the changes. But there’s a difference between watching a tornado on TV and having one blow the roof off your house. Now that your baby is actually here, it’s pretty obvious that nothing could have fully prepped you for the daily (and nightly) challenges of living with a newborn.

While trying to take care of your son around the clock and dealing with all the adjustments of being a new mom, there’s a good chance that she’s experiencing symptoms of what’s generally called “baby blues,” feelings of sadness, loneliness, vulnerability, and questioning her ability to be a good mom. And the fact that she’s breastfeeding on demand – and is experiencing the exhaustion that goes along with it – just makes things worse.

Your wife probably doesn’t mean to snap at you. In some irrational way, she may actually believe that you aren’t pulling your weight. After all, you spend most of your day in the company of adults, while she is housebound with a baby.

Ask yourself this: Are you really doing as much as you reasonably can to help your wife through this difficult time, or could you do more? Obviously, since you have a full-time job, she can’t expect you to stay up at night taking care of the baby – someone has to put food on the table. On the other hand, maybe you can take over from your wife as soon as you come home, giving her some much-needed “me” time, and you a great opportunity to spend some quality time with your baby.

http://www.sanluisobispo.com/living/family_relationships/story/948784.html 

Allergies Linked to Delaying Solid Foods.

Delaying solid foods when children are babies may be tied to food allergies later on, Finnish researchers say.

Introducing eggs, oats, and wheat into an infant’s diet late in the game — around age 6 months — was associated with food allergies by age 5, Bright I. Nwaru, MPhil, MSc, of the University of Tampere, and colleagues reported online in Pediatrics.

In a related finding, late introduction of potatoes and fish was tied to sensitivity to inhaled allergens, such as pollen, animal dander, and dust mites.

“Introducing solid foods late to the child may increase the risk of being sensitized to these allergens,” Nwaru wrote in an e-mail.

Current pediatric recommendations suggest exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months to prevent allergic diseases. These recommendations have been based mainly on the assumption that an infant’s gut mucosal barrier is immature, and that introducing solid foods early may instigate sensitization to foods and inhaled allergens.

But emerging evidence shows these recommendations lack a strong scientific basis, Nwaru wrote.

“The implication of our study on breastfeeding and introduction of solid foods — like other recent studies have shown — is that prolonging exclusive breastfeeding, thereby introducing solid foods late, may not prevent allergic diseases in the child,” he added.

But he emphasized that the finding does not diminish the benefits of breastfeeding for six months among the general population — merely that exclusive breastfeeding doesn’t have a role in allergy prevention.

The researchers looked at data on 994 children from the Finnish Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention nutrition study. This was a prospective birth cohort study, so that information was available on breastfeeding, age at introduction of solid foods, and allergen-specific immunoglobulin E levels at age 5.

Every child had HLA-conferred susceptibility to type 1 diabetes.

In the study, mothers breastfed for a median of 1.8 months, and the median age at the introduction of the first solid food was 3.5 months.

Potatoes were the earliest food introduced to the children, followed by fruits and berries, carrots, cabbages, cereals, meat, fish, and eggs.

The researchers found that late introduction of potatoes, oats, rye, wheat, meat, fish, and eggs was significantly associated with a sensitization for food allergy, albeit after different time periods: 4 months for potatoes, 5 months for oats, 7 months for rye, 6 months for wheat, 5.5 months for meat, 8.2 months for fish, and 10.5 months for eggs.

Late introduction of potatoes, rye, meat, and fish was significantly associated with sensitization to any inhaled allergen.

Egg allergy was associated with late introduction of potatoes, carrots, cabbages, oats, wheat, rye, meat, fish, and eggs, while wheat allergy was related to late introduction of potatoes, wheat, rye, fish, and eggs.

In adjusted analyses, eggs, oats, and wheat were the most important foods related to sensitization to food allergens (P=0.007, P=0.004, and P=0.002, respectively). Potatoes and fish were the most important foods associated with inhalant allergic sensitization (P=0.043, P=0.028, respectively).

There was no evidence of reverse causality, when parental allergic rhinitis and asthma were taken into account.

The study was limited because children were selected on the basis of HLA-conferred susceptibility to type 1 diabetes, which may limit its generalizability to the general population.

Li Zuo, MD, of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, said the study was also limited by using food sensitivity but not food allergy as an outcome for the study.

“I am not supporting the conclusion of this article,” Zuo said in an e-mail. “But I support the concept that late introduction of solid foods may not protect children from allergic diseases and I also support early solid food introduction for many children not at high risk for allergic reaction.”

Zuo added that the topic is hotly debated by allergists, and believes the “answer to increased allergic diseases is not [based] on the timing of solid food introduction, but something that happens earlier.

http://www.medpagetoday.com/AllergyImmunology/Allergy/17382

Sushi & Breastfeeding Join Birth Defects & Preterm Birth as Leading Concerns of Moms

Moms worry. Even before they become moms. From the minute they start thinking about whether they want to have a baby until long past the birth, moms worry.

Will my baby be healthy? Will I be a good mom? Can I dye my hair while pregnant? What can I eat?

The March of Dimes poll found that the number one thing moms worried about was birth defects – 78 percent said they were worried their child would be born less than perfect. Stress was moms’ second fear, with 74 percent answering that they were concerned if stress in their life would harm their baby’s health. Preterm birth was a close third with 71 percent saying they were worried their baby would be born too soon.

Surprisingly, only 70 percent thought about the fear of pain of childbirth and 55 percent were worried that they wouldn’t get to the hospital on time!

Other things moms worried about were:

  • 60 percent worried they wouldn’t be able to breastfeed successfully.
  • 59 percent worried about losing weight after pregnancy.
  • And, 59 percent worried about getting pregnant in the first place.
  • Sushi and fish was the number one food concern, with 61 percent concerned

 

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/sushi–breastfeeding-join-birth-defects–preterm-birth-as-leading-concerns-of-moms-78840487.html

No risk to 4 month old babies eating cereal-based foods, says EFSA

(see link for full story)

http://www.nutraingredients.com/Health-condition-categories/Maternal-infant-health/No-risk-to-4-month-old-babies-eating-cereal-based-foods-says-EFSA/?utm_source=Newsletter_Product&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Newsletter%2BProduct

More Muslim, Christian, and Sikh mothers stop breastfeeding early: study

Mothers may breastfeed their children two complete years for whoever wishes to complete the nursing [period]. Surah Al-Baqarah : 233

The Holy Quran is clear that the duration of breastfeeding of infants are for a period of two years. World Health Organization (WHO) and Government of India’s guidelines also suggest breastfeeding for a period of two years. Breast milk is an excellent source of nutrition and essential for the healthy growth of the child.

A latest study finds that a greater share of Muslim, Christian, and Sikh women breastfeed their young ones for less than two years. The study is done by Harvard School of Public Health of Boston, Massachusetts, USA and published in July 2008 issue of peer-reviewed journal Maternal & Child Nutrition.

Data analysis revealed that religion was an important factor in the likelihood of stopping breastfeeding. This likelihood was significantly higher for Muslims, Sikhs and Christian. In terms of adjusted ratio Muslim mothers are 10% more than Hindu mothers in stopping breastfeeding before their children have reached the age of 24 months, while this ratio is much higher for Christians (34%) and Sikhs (33%). Researchers made a note that there is nothing in these religion that will explain early termination of breastfeeding therefore it has to be cultural factors and norms.

http://twocircles.net/2009dec08/more_muslim_christian_and_sikh_mothers_stop_breastfeeding_early_study.html

Shunning the Family Bed. Who Benefits Most?

According to Dr. Jay Gordon, babies sleeping on a safe surface with sober, nonsmoking parents respond to their parents, and the parents respond to them. The chance of SIDS occurring in this situation are close to zero. Babies in a crib or in a room away from their parents, on the other hand, will breastfeed less and are at greater risk of infections, including life-threatening ones.

The medical profession, as it often does, is approaching the entire idea of the family bed backward. A baby in the same bed with his or her parents is surrounded by the best possible surveillance and safety system. It must be the responsibility of the manufacturers and proponents of cribs and separated sleep to prove that such disruption is safe, not the other way around.

Newborn babies breathe in irregular rhythms and even stop breathing for a few seconds at a time. To put it simply, they are not designed to sleep alone.

http://www.foodconsumer.org/newsite/Non-food/Lifestyle/shunning_the_family_bed_081220090712.html

‘We Go Into the Bush to Collect Herbs’

Tumba, the mother of three, could not explain what exclusive breast feeding is all about, neither has she seen reason for imbibing the practice, despite being told of its significance.

According to her, she was in the hospital for the first time after giving birth thrice, explaining that whenever she was pregnant, there were some elderly women around her that nursed her throughout the period of her pregnancy to delivery. For the three occasions she was in labour, there was never a time when she had experienced any difficulty or complication during or after labour.

Tumba added that she was only in the hospital for the antenatal care, after she was forced to visit the hospital by her relations whom she had just visited in Nafada town. She added that as soon as her husband comes down to fetch her, that would be the end of her visitation to the hospital.

“Going to health facilities for antenatal and medical treatment is only for the elite that live in the cities. In my case we only go into bush to collect herbs for our medication ,and that of our children”, Tumba stated.

When asked whether she has any knowledge about Exclusive Breastfeeding (EBF), Tumba said it was an abomination to give a baby the poisonous milk that comes immediately after delivery. To her, the first milk must be poured away before the newly born baby would be initiated to the mother’s breast, saying in keeping with her tradition, the first thing to be given to the new born baby should be water and nothing else.

Her words ” The first thing to be administered to a newly born child is feeding him with water. That is what I did to all my children and you can see them, they are still hale and hearty. So I don’t believe in giving breast milk as the first food after birth”.

To her, breastfeeding was placing the child on his mother’s breast to suck for a while, particularly, when the child indicated a sign of being hungry by persistently crying. He/she would be introduced to the breast and after the child stopped crying ,it indicated that the baby was satisfied. The child is put on breast milk only if he/she cries again.

She further argued that after three months of mixed breastfeeding with water, the child would be introduced to food, preparatory to the introduction of weaning (uprooting from breast milk) of the child. At six months the child would be fully introduced to food which called for his/her instant removal from the mother’s breast.

The chief Nursing officer cautioned nursing mothers against failure to introduce a newly born baby to the breast, debunking the notion that the first milk of the nursing mother was contaminated, and for that reason it should be poured away. Hajia Aisha argued that the first available milk after delivery contains colostrums, which is full of water and high concentration of nutrients that could not be obtained in any infant formula food. Therefore, this indicated the necessity of introducing the newly born baby to skin to skin breastfeeding, immediately after birth.

he added that the breastfeeding mother needs to sit in an upright position while placing her child on a breast, which is expected to last for about 15 to 20 minutes, before the child could be transferred to the other breast. By so doing the child would have sufficient time to suckle the necessary ingredients contained in the breast milk.This is contrary to the traditional practice that was characterized by indiscriminate placement and transfer of a child from one breast to another ,by the nursing mothers.

The nursing mothers will be taught how to prepare a pap full of protein, by fortifying the pap with Soya beans and groundnut formula, for the growth and development of the child.

http://allafrica.com/stories/200912070653.html

A Look Into Facebook’s Judicial System

What’s nudity? The policy enforcers at Facebook, a team of more than 100 spread out in offices around the world, including Northern California, London and Dublin, struggled with that question earlier this year. A legion of angry mothers revolted in response to the company removing photos of women breastfeeding.

The nudity policy, although not explicitly outlined, is pretty simple: no exposed nipples or nether regions. In a few cases, snap judgment during the so-called breastfeeding purge caused some fairly innocent pictures to get zapped.

But Barry Schnitt, Facebook’s director of policy communications, asserts that the company’s breastfeeding policy was largely misunderstood. The majority of the photos removed were of completely nude women (posing in mirrors or bathtubs) who happened to involve a baby eating lunch, Schnitt said.

Another misnomer is that the company was employing people to blindly click through pictures in search of breasts to flag for removal. “We only act on things that are reported to us,” Schnitt said during an interview at Facebook’s campus in Palo Alto. The vast majority of those reports come in the form of buttons throughout the site that users can click to highlight offensive content. So, if your au naturel pose gets zapped, blame a friend.

Facebook actually takes action on less than half of all reports.

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/technology/2009/12/facebook-ban.html

Oh dear. A golden rule for life is that that there are some things you don’t put down on paper. Ever. The nation’s weary couch-potatoes woke yesterday to a gust of shocked hilarity, as somebody leaked a BBC document fussily labelled “Knowledge Commissioning Graded Talent List”. It puts TV presenters under “Top Tier Highly Valued”, “Mid-range average appeal”, “On the way up” and — at this point the reader falls off the chair, helpless with glee — “Occasional sparkle but limited appeal”.

The mad list is interesting, though, as a symptom of a wider phenomenon: list-mania and tabulation fever has been the besetting folly of the Noughties. Government adores its faulty league tables of schools, universities, hospitals and local authority services. Instead of intelligent inspection and help, billions of pounds and years of effort are poured into lists and tables that serve little purpose. They demoralise some, make others smug, and condition thousands of managers to work to targets that skew and corrupt their core mission. Gradual growth, local adaptation and interesting initiatives are stifled: hospitals good at caring for the dying get marked down because people die there, schools that deal valiantly with problem estates get slammed as “failing”.

Meanwhile subtler indicators are ignored. A small maternity hospital is closed because the acute hospital is more “productive”, but ask the actual mothers cared for at the little hospital, and you find that their rates of breastfeeding and health are higher, of depression lower. The same principle applies to the elderly who lose rural cottage hospitals and become more, not less, dependent. In every area, formulaic paperwork outranks sense.

You can see why. Lists and tables make managers feel safe, as if life and a happy society were a science, not an art. Given enough lists, they hope for a formula. But in reality, league tables mainly appeal to a judgmental, talent-show mentality. They work fine in sport — a goal is a goal — and book sales or cinema tickets are countable. In subtler fields of effort they are often worse than worthless.  At least daffy media lists have no power (with luck, neither does the BBC bêtise). But they should be mocked, because they only encourage government itself in its damaging love of fruitless, phantom tidiness in an imaginary paper world.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/comment/article6955233.ece

Teaching Black Women To Embrace Breast-Feeding

African-American moms have the lowest rates of all — by some measures, they are half as likely to nurse as whites and Hispanics

When Kathi Barber gave birth a decade ago, she was the first in her family in generations to nurse, and was dumbfounded to realize she had no role models. Barber became obsessed with encouraging nursing among black moms, as numerous studies show that exclusive breast-feeding can reduce a baby’s chances of developing diabetes, obesity, ear infections and respiratory illness. Yet Barber was frustrated that for many new mothers, their only image of this age-old act may come from a museum or a National Geographic documentary. “Tribal women, with elongated breasts, earrings and tribal jewelry. And let’s say we’re trying to promote that to a 25-year-old, mmm …” she laughs. “I don’t think that’s going to do the trick.”

So Barber founded the African-American Breastfeeding Alliance and wrote The Black Woman’s Guide to Breastfeeding. As a lactation consultant, she travels the country putting on workshops and training sessions, and encouraging hospitals and family clinics to reach out to this community.

In fact, the older, more educated and higher-income a mother is, the more likely she is to breast-feed. But experts say the disparity for African-Americans is so great it transcends socio-economics.

Barber says work is clearly a huge barrier, and black moms may be more likely to hold lower-wage jobs with no breaks allowed for nursing. African-Americans have also had to earn money since long before the women’s liberation movement.

In fact, Barber thinks you can trace part of the problem all the way back to the breakup of families under slavery, and the enduring, negative image of so-called mammies — slaves made to serve as wet nurses for their master’s white children.

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=121755349

Coordinator promotes breast feeding

Kelly Sibley is in charge of promoting one of the best ways to keep newborn babies healthy, a practice in which Oregon leads the nation Sibley, 52, is the breast feeding program coordinator for Oregon Division of Public Health. She lives in Portland.

Q: Has Oregon implemented any public policies that have helped successfully promote breast feeding?

A: We have a law that protects a mother’s right to breast feed in public. We also have a law to protect breast feeding in the workplace, so mom who are returning to work are provided a clean and private place to express her milk.

Q: Is there anything else that has helped make Oregon get so far ahead of the curve when it comes to breast feeding?

A: I don’t think we’re totally clear about why we are so far ahead. I think for Oregon, breast feeding is seen as normal, more normal than it’s seen in other places. You are walking in a park and you look over and you see a mom on a bench and she’s breast feeding, it’s more likely to be accepted as normal here. She’s more likely to get a smile or just be left alone. In other places, she might be asked to leave or asked to go into the bathroom. I say, how would you feel if someone asked you to eat your lunch in the bathroom?

http://www.statesmanjournal.com/article/20091214/NEWS/912140315/1001/news

Samantha Harris On Managing Motherhood, Career

After welcoming her daughter in 2007, Samantha Harris learned all too quickly that it often takes a village to raise a child….The juggling of her career — including her cohosting responsibilities on Dancing With the Stars, a correspondent for The Insider, and cohosting Entertainment Tonight Weekend — began only three weeks after delivering her daughter Josselyn Sydney when Samantha returned to the DWtS set….With baby girl at home with the nanny, the new mama arrived to work with her pump in hand!..“I was breastfeeding so I was pumping again and again throughout the production day and right before I went on stage because we didn’t want to have any mishaps in a gown — on live television!” she tells Working Mother.

http://celebrity-babies.com/2009/12/12/samantha-harris-on-managing-motherhood-career/

Vera Farmiga Says Family of Three Is ‘Inseparable’

In her new film Up in the Air, Vera Farmiga portrays corporate executive and frequent-flyer obsessed Alex, a love interest for George Clooney. Although in real life she’s married to musician Renn Hawkey of Deadsy and mom to 11-month-old Fynn,…With Vera’s busy career, Renn and Fynn are often along for the ride as she films on location. “My husband and I have made a pact,” she explains. “We are inseparable. He and my son just come along. I can’t handle it alone. I don’t like it when they’re not with me. I need them.”…Calling childbirth “just an incredible gift,” Vera, 36, says that motherhood both helped and hindered her approach to the role. “I never felt so empowered, so powerful, so womanly as I did after I gave birth,” she shares. “I felt more feminine than I ever had in my life. So I just rode that wave.”…At the same time — as a breastfeeding mom — Vera says that she had to take nursing breaks while filming — especially during love scenes!…“I’ll tell you what it was like when we locked lips,” Vera reveals. “We’d do it and then I’d say, ‘OK, George, now I’ve got to go breastfeed.’ Then I’d come back and be trying to find sort of clever positions to hide the wet spots on my silk blouse.”…There were also hormones to contend with, and Vera admits “I got very tired at times and, God knows, there were a lot of tears.”…Regardless, she says she had no reservations about accepting the role — or stepping into motherhood….“The birth was going to be close to the start of filming and it was my first child–but, I come from a family of seven children. I was always very comfortable changing diapers. I felt confident that I’d be fine as a first time mother. I said to [director] Jason [Reitman], ‘This is a great creative opportunity and I could use a paycheck.’”

http://celebrity-babies.com/2009/12/11/vera-farmiga-says-family-of-three-is-inseparable/

Study Links Factors to Choice of Infant Sleep Position

Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health have identified three principal factors linked to whether caregivers place infants to sleep on their backs. Those three factors are: whether they received a physician’s recommendation to place infants only on their backs for sleep, fear that the infant might choke while sleeping on the back, and concerns for an infant’s comfort while sleeping on the back.

The survey also found that after increasing steadily, the proportion of infants placed to sleep on their backs leveled off in the years since 2001.

A greater proportion of African-American infants than white or Hispanic infants die from SIDS each year

In the study, the researchers reported that between 2003-2007, only 53.6 percent reported that their doctors had advised them to put their babies on their backs only.

Always place babies on their backs to sleep — Infants who sleep on their backs are less likely to die of SIDS than babies who sleep on their stomachs or sides. Placing your baby on his or her back to sleep is the number one way to reduce the risk of SIDS.
Use the back sleep position every time — Infants who usually sleep on their backs but who are then placed on their stomachs, like for a nap, are at very high risk for SIDS. So it is important for babies to sleep on their backs every time, for naps and at night.
Place your baby on a firm sleep surface, such as a safety-approved crib mattress covered with a fitted sheet — Never place an infant to sleep on a pillow, quilt, sheepskin, or other soft surface. Information on crib safety and regulatory requirements for infant cribs is available from the Consumer Product Safety Commission at http://www.cpsc.gov/info/cribs/index.html.
Keep soft objects, toys, and loose bedding out of an infant’s sleep area – Don’t use pillows, blankets, quilts, sheepskins, or pillow-like bumpers in your baby’s sleep area. Keep all items away from the infant’s face.
Avoid letting your baby overheat during sleep – Dress your infant in light sleep clothing and keep the room at a temperature that is comfortable for an adult.

Think about using a clean, dry pacifier when placing your infant down to sleep, but don’t force the baby to take it. ( If you’re breastfeeding, wait until your child is 1 month old, or is used to breastfeeding before using a pacifier. )
In addition to Dr. Colson, other authors of the study were Denis Rybin, Theodore Colton and Michael J. Corwin of Boston University; Lauren Smith, of the Massachusetts Department of Public Health; and George Lister, of University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas.

http://media-newswire.com/release_1107902.html

Column: Cut the crude commentary about breast feeding moms

By Ruth Butler | The Grand Rapids Press

Seriously?

A proposed bill to help mothers feed their babies is giving people fits? I guess folks would prefer mothers with babies stay home – drapes closed, if possible – until the child is old enough to scarf burgers at Mickey Ds the way God intended. Isn’t that, after all, why he created formula via his humble servant Justus von Liebig in 1867? (Thanks, Wiki.)

Whether the bill protecting a mother’s right to breastfeed in public passes through the state House has become secondary. What’s appalling is the reaction of those who are a) offended and/or b) driven to crude commentaries at the prospect of moms offering nutrition to children – the ones who are America’s future and the crux of every really important protest. Cue the “What About the Children?” chorus.

Everyone needs to calm down and accept breasts make people crazy. They are sexual, they are signs of womanhood (ask any 12-year-old girl – or boy.)

They are – insert giggle here – titillating.

Yet, I’ve never met a nursing mother who viewed feeding time with her child as an equivalent to foreplay or exhibitionism.

Sure, those who think mothers caught with a hungry child in public should do it in private – ever eaten your lunch in a bathroom stall? – also claim to have seen examples of flashing during the meal. But having been one, and seen many more nursing mothers, I testify most women are discreet. They cover themselves and focus on the wonderful task at hand, rather than take feeding time as a chance to put it out there for evaluation.

Where are the howls of protest for women who do just that? Why do you think they call it Hooters? Because only wise old owls eat there? Isn’t more being offered than what’s on the menu, in a look-don’t-touch sort of way?

Seriously. Strut your stuff at the beach, on the dance floor, in situations where cleavage is expected. But feeding time? It’s among the least sexual moments of a human’s life.

The only sexual thing going on at nursing time is in the minds of others. Making it their, not the mother’s, problem. Unless, of course, she’s kicked out of a building or the police are called (Google Target, breastfeeding.)

Of course, we could follow the example of other countries that see this and other ways women weave their seductive webs as way too provocative.

Burkas all around! Cover the hair, the lips, the body. Save the weak from themselves.

Seriously.

http://www.mlive.com/living/grand-rapids/index.ssf/2009/12/column_cut_the_crude_commentar.html

Recently, police were called on a complaint about a breastfeeding mother in a Harper Woods store. Here’s what local moms had to say.

“The people at Target were being stupid and by calling the police they made this into a bigger issue than it needed to be. I feel bad for the woman and her husband at being called out and embarassed for doing something completely normal! It was uncalled for and ridiculous!”— CinderMomma

“There is always more to the story I think but unlike the last incident which took place in a restaurant (a completely different scenario) I can’t imagine what the issue would be. I have seen women breastfeeding in the mall (at least I assume they were since they were discreet) and really who would care? Unless…..things got loud?”— Coco958

“If you are breast feeding a four week old infant in an aisle at Target you are a poor parent…period.”— paf

“if you’re bf’ing IN THE AISLE, (a) you’re probably blocking aisle traffic, (b) it ain’t the best positioning for the kid, (c) it ain’t the safest way to assure yourself and those around you that your boob won’t accidentally “unfurl” so to speak. Not saying kids shouldn’t be fed, but it ain’t all about you and your boob and your baby. There ARE other people who are actually shopping too ya know.”— shaari

http://www.freep.com/article/20091213/FEATURES01/912130336/1026/Features01/Recently-police-were-called-on-a-complaint-about-a-breastfeeding-mother-in-a-Harper-Woods-store.-Heres-what-local-moms-had-to-say.-Todays-topic

Someone Needs To Explain Babies To Kourtney!

Before one crawls out of her vagina and is thrusted into a world where his mother thinks she should be breastfeeding until the kid is five.  FIVE?! Gross!

http://perezhilton.com/2009-12-11-someone-needs-to-explain-babies-to-kourtney

Can Kendra Wilkinson breast-feed her baby even though she has implants?

Former Playboy model and reality TV star Kendra Wilkinson, wife of Indianapolis Colts wide receiver Hank Baskett, gave birth to a boy Friday morning. During her pregnancy, Wilkinson announced her intention to nurse her child despite having breast implants. Do implants affect a mother’s ability to breast-feed?

Generally, no. Most women who get breast implants, whether made of saline or silicone, can go on to breast-feed. But some types of breast augmentation surgery are more likely than others to result in complications when it comes to nursing. The two most common methods of implantation are peri-areolar incision (slicing just below the nipple) and inframammary incision (slicing along the crease below the breast). Cutting around the areola, the dark circle of skin surrounding the nipple, is much more likely to interfere with the network of nerves, glands, and milk ducts located toward the front of the breast that produce and carry milk to the nipple. Cutting underneath the breast allows the surgeon to circumvent that whole system rather than going straight through it. If a woman wants to breastfeed after getting implants, doctors usually recommend inframammary procedure, or an alternative route of insertion like the underarm or the belly button. Some doctors, however, still favor the peri-areolar technique because it allows for more precision when placing the implant and can produce less noticeable scarring. (Other considerations for which procedure to get include breast size, pain, and risk of the implants hardening.)

… The likelihood of nursing problems also depends on where, exactly, the surgeon places the implant. Subglandular placement—behind the mammary glands but in front of the chest muscles—has a higher risk of breastfeeding complications. That’s because the tissue surrounding the implant is more likely to harden when it’s in that position, which can make nursing difficult or painful. (The advantage is that the operation itself is quick and relatively painless.) The alternative is to slip the implant behind the chest muscle, separating the balloon from the lactation system entirely. This procedure is more common and generally better for breastfeeding. The downside of submuscular placement is that it’s more painful—the doctor has to fidget with the muscle itself—and it takes longer after surgery for the implant to “drop” into a more natural-looking position.

Implants could also interfere with nursing if they’re too big compared with the amount of skin and tissue surrounding them. Lactation proceeds most smoothly when the mother’s milk-producing lobes—arranged around the center of the breast—have room to expand and contract. If an implant puts too much pressure on the lobes, that can reduce the amount of milk generated

http://www.slate.com/id/2238096/

Social support during childbirth as a catalyst for early breastfeeding initiation for first-time Nigerian Mothers

Initiation of breastfeeding can be difficult in a busy maternity centre with inadequate manpower and social support. This study aims to explore the role of psychosocial support offered by companions on breastfeeding initiation among first-time mothers.  Methods: This is a secondary data analysis of a randomised controlled trial conducted among women attending the antenatal clinic of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria in 2007.  Those in the experimental group were asked to bring someone of their choice to the labour room to act as a companion; the comparison group received standard care. The results of 209 HIV negative women who had vaginal births were analysed.

The main outcome measure was time to initiation of breastfeeding after childbirth.

Results: Of the total, 94 had companions during labour while 115 did not have a companion. The median time to breastfeeding initiation was significantly shorter in those with companions compared to controls (16 vs.54 minutes; p <0.01). The cumulative survival analysis indicated that all in the treatmentgroup had initiated breastfeeding by 26 minutes, while among the control group none had commenced at 30 minutes post-delivery with some as late as 12 hours.

Conclusion: Use of companions during labour is associated with earlier time to breastfeeding initiation among first-time mothers in Nigeria

http://7thspace.com/headlines/328403/social_support_during_childbirth_as_a_catalyst_for_early_breastfeeding_initiation_for_first_time_nigerian_mothers.html

Breastfeeding Provision in Senate Bill Causes Controversy

The Senate health care reform bill is more than 2,000 pages long. One of the provisions, a provision on page 1,239, is being applauded by new mothers. But business owners are asking what it has to do with any real reform.

The Rochester Business Alliance says its members are not against providing this kind of benefit to new mothers, but they say adding it to the Senate bill is wrong because it has nothing to do reforming health care.  MY fear is that throwing in things is just going to add costs,” says Sandy Parker of the Rochester Business Alliance. “What they’re doing now is just shifting costs. They’re doing nothing to change the delivery of health care… They’re doing nothing to address why health care costs are escalating.”

Those who support this bill say employers do benefit. Mothers with healthy infants take less time off of work and have less stress. The cost of these rooms is paid for in the first year alone.

In a survey, Rochester business owners say the want to continue to provide insurance benefits but only if they can get relief from escalating premiums.

The bottom line is that the bill keeps adding requirements for employers without  providing that relief.

http://www.13wham.com/news/local/story/Breastfeeding-Provision-in-Senate-Bill-Causes/lqyWY3b7MUintrfUeNQyUw.cspx

Infants without HIV suffer no growth check, despite maternal infection

Exclusive breastfeeding, however, significantly improved the long-term health of children born to HIV-infected mothers, lending further support to the recently revised World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines on infant feeding.

Being undernourished is predictive of death as well as poor early development in low- and middle- income countries where HIV is prevalent.

Infant feeding patterns affect growth; the mean weight of children who are breastfed is greater than most children who are formula-fed during the first half of infancy.

Of importance in these findings is the fact that HIV-exposed but uninfected children had a growth rate as good as that of the reference group. The authors note this is significant for two reasons:

  • Of the approximately 40% of infants born to HIV-infected mothers in Southern Africa most will be exposed but uninfected. While important, the growth and development of these children is often ignored.

 

Breastfed HIV-infected infants had higher scores for weight for age than those who were not, in particular during the first six weeks of life—a difference of 130 grammes for male children and 110 grammes for female children.

And, in line with recent WHO recommendations, they conclude: “These finding strengthen the recommendations of exclusive breastfeeding for HIV-infected women in resource-poor settings, for long-term child health.”

http://www.aidsmap.com/en/news/85CD7329-BD69-49E6-BEEE-9BA792BA6BBF.asp

A paradigm shift in newborn care
(The Philippine Star)

We’ve seen it portrayed in movies. A baby is delivered. It is held upside down and spanked. The umbilical cord is clamped and cut, and the baby is whisked away to be washed and cleaned immediately. Wrong!

Washing should be postponed until eight hours after birth,” said Dr. Aleli Sudiacal of the Department of Health (DOH) at a forum held recently at the Quirino Memorial Medical Center in Quezon City.

Aware of the need to raise the quality of post-natal care in health facilities, the World Health Organization (WHO), in partnership with the DOH, is promoting a new approach where evidence-based components are integrated in post-natal care. Called the Essential Newborn Care (ENC), this simple set of proven intervention can save the lives of newborns.

The new protocol is to postpone washing and instead, dry the baby immediately, within the first 30 seconds, and initiate skin-to-skin contact with the mother before clamping the umbilical cord. Breastfeeding should also be initiated within the first hour of birth.

“It’s a major paradigm shift,” said Dr. Honorata Catibog, head of the DOH Task Force on the Rapid Reduction of Maternal and Neonatal Mortality.

“Studies showed delayed breastfeeding by one day increases by 2.6-fold the risk of death due to infection,” said Dr. Asuncion Silvestre, head of the PGH Lactation Unit and Milk Bank. 

“Before, the focus was on pre-natal care, with the practice of at least four pre-natal visits. But essential newborn care actually starts even before the mother gets pregnant

. It starts with the status of the health of the woman,” Silvestre said. “All pregnancies are considered at high risk. We advocate facility-based delivery attended by skilled health professionals.”

“We practice the team approach involving doctor, nurse, and midwife,” said Dr. Bella Vitangcol who led the familiarization tour of the essential newborn care facilities at the Quirino Memorial Medical Center, a pioneer in newborn care

http://www.philstar.com/Article.aspx?articleId=530921&publicationSubCategoryId=75

Baby Dies Aboard United Airways Flight: A Response

Pardon me for quarreling with the experts, but this mother is being blamed for falling asleep? On a transatlantic flight? With a 4-week-old?

What nursing mother hasn’t fallen asleep while nursing her child? Back before the days of studies and guidelines and research and panels, back when the experts were primarily mothers, most women probably fell asleep every night while nursing their children. Many still do. But we’re not supposed to, because sleeping while holding a baby is taboo right now, along with letting babies sleep on their stomachs, or using forward-facing car seats, or feeding babies honey before age one.

We have expert-approved guidelines for every possible aspect of child-rearing, and I appreciate the insight afforded by such guidelines. But I wonder if they make it easier to blame parents when the unthinkable happens. The recommendations are ever-increasing and ever-changing, and that’s not even getting into the fact that on most issues, experts disagree. Parents are stumbling under the weight of all these “shoulds,” and when tragedy strikes, these recommendations morph into pointing fingers of accusation.

http://blog.christianitytoday.com/women/2009/12/baby_dies_aboard_united_airway.html

Breastfeeding for 5 years?

Kourtney Kardashian plans to breastfeed for five years.

The US reality star is expecting her first child, a boy, with partner Scott Disick later this month. Her sister Khloe has revealed Kourtney was initially clueless about what motherhood would entail, and expected to have to breastfeed until her son started school.

“Kourtney was like ‘I’m so excited, I don’t have to cook for five years,’ ” Khloe said. “And I go, ‘What do you mean?’ She’s like, ‘I’m gonna breastfeed.’ I go, ‘For five years?’ She has, like, no idea!”

Kourtney’s other sister Kim added she never thought of her 30-year-old sibling as maternal. She claims Kourtney has always been afraid of children, and done everything in her power to steer clear of them.

Kim said on The Rachel Ray Show: “Kourtney was never ever the type that I ever would think would ever want to have kids. She owns a kid’s clothing store, and if a kid would come in she would be like, ‘Where’s your mom? You need to go find your mom and come in with her.’ She didn’t understand it and she wasn’t that nurturing.”

http://entertainment.iafrica.com/news/2104660.htm

Ask Mr. Dad: The joys of sleep deprivation

Dear Mr. Dad: Our son is 3 weeks old and my wife is exhausted from breastfeeding. I have to be out of the house early in the morning to make it to work, but I do help her out between 2 a.m. and 4 a.m. But when I try to get a little sleep before or after those hours, or if I’m too slow to wake up, she’ll say to our son things like “Daddy doesn’t care.” This hurts my feelings because I’m doing as much as I can, and I do have to put in an eight-hour day in the office. How do I handle this situation?

I’m sure that everyone you knew tried to warn you that becoming a dad would turn your life upside down, right? And I’m sure you tried to prepare yourself for all the changes. But there’s a difference between watching a tornado on TV and having one blow the roof off your house. Now that your baby is actually here, it’s pretty obvious that nothing could have fully prepped you for the daily (and nightly) challenges of living with a newborn.

While trying to take care of your son around the clock and dealing with all the adjustments of being a new mom, there’s a good chance that she’s experiencing symptoms of what’s generally called “baby blues,” feelings of sadness, loneliness, vulnerability, and questioning her ability to be a good mom. And the fact that she’s breastfeeding on demand – and is experiencing the exhaustion that goes along with it – just makes things worse.

Your wife probably doesn’t mean to snap at you. In some irrational way, she may actually believe that you aren’t pulling your weight. After all, you spend most of your day in the company of adults, while she is housebound with a baby.

Ask yourself this: Are you really doing as much as you reasonably can to help your wife through this difficult time, or could you do more? Obviously, since you have a full-time job, she can’t expect you to stay up at night taking care of the baby – someone has to put food on the table. On the other hand, maybe you can take over from your wife as soon as you come home, giving her some much-needed “me” time, and you a great opportunity to spend some quality time with your baby.

http://www.sanluisobispo.com/living/family_relationships/story/948784.html

Allergies Linked To Delaying Solid Foods

 

Delaying solid foods when children are babies may be tied to food allergies later on, Finnish researchers say.

Introducing eggs, oats, and wheat into an infant’s diet late in the game — around age 6 months — was associated with food allergies by age 5, Bright I. Nwaru, MPhil, MSc, of the University of Tampere, and colleagues reported online in Pediatrics.

In a related finding, late introduction of potatoes and fish was tied to sensitivity to inhaled allergens, such as pollen, animal dander, and dust mites.

“Introducing solid foods late to the child may increase the risk of being sensitized to these allergens,” Nwaru wrote in an e-mail.

Current pediatric recommendations suggest exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months to prevent allergic diseases. These recommendations have been based mainly on the assumption that an infant’s gut mucosal barrier is immature, and that introducing solid foods early may instigate sensitization to foods and inhaled allergens.

But emerging evidence shows these recommendations lack a strong scientific basis, Nwaru wrote.

“The implication of our study on breastfeeding and introduction of solid foods — like other recent studies have shown — is that prolonging exclusive breastfeeding, thereby introducing solid foods late, may not prevent allergic diseases in the child,” he added.

But he emphasized that the finding does not diminish the benefits of breastfeeding for six months among the general population — merely that exclusive breastfeeding doesn’t have a role in allergy prevention.

The researchers looked at data on 994 children from the Finnish Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention nutrition study. This was a prospective birth cohort study, so that information was available on breastfeeding, age at introduction of solid foods, and allergen-specific immunoglobulin E levels at age 5.

Every child had HLA-conferred susceptibility to type 1 diabetes.

In the study, mothers breastfed for a median of 1.8 months, and the median age at the introduction of the first solid food was 3.5 months.

Potatoes were the earliest food introduced to the children, followed by fruits and berries, carrots, cabbages, cereals, meat, fish, and eggs.

The researchers found that late introduction of potatoes, oats, rye, wheat, meat, fish, and eggs was significantly associated with a sensitization for food allergy, albeit after different time periods: 4 months for potatoes, 5 months for oats, 7 months for rye, 6 months for wheat, 5.5 months for meat, 8.2 months for fish, and 10.5 months for eggs.

Late introduction of potatoes, rye, meat, and fish was significantly associated with sensitization to any inhaled allergen.

Egg allergy was associated with late introduction of potatoes, carrots, cabbages, oats, wheat, rye, meat, fish, and eggs, while wheat allergy was related to late introduction of potatoes, wheat, rye, fish, and eggs.

In adjusted analyses, eggs, oats, and wheat were the most important foods related to sensitization to food allergens (P=0.007, P=0.004, and P=0.002, respectively). Potatoes and fish were the most important foods associated with inhalant allergic sensitization (P=0.043, P=0.028, respectively).

There was no evidence of reverse causality, when parental allergic rhinitis and asthma were taken into account.

The study was limited because children were selected on the basis of HLA-conferred susceptibility to type 1 diabetes, which may limit its generalizability to the general population.

Li Zuo, MD, of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, said the study was also limited by using food sensitivity but not food allergy as an outcome for the study.

“I am not supporting the conclusion of this article,” Zuo said in an e-mail. “But I support the concept that late introduction of solid foods may not protect children from allergic diseases and I also support early solid food introduction for many children not at high risk for allergic reaction.”

Zuo added that the topic is hotly debated by allergists, and believes the “answer to increased allergic diseases is not [based] on the timing of solid food introduction, but something that happens earlier.

http://www.medpagetoday.com/AllergyImmunology/Allergy/17382

Sushi & Breastfeeding Join Birth Defects & Preterm Birth as Leading Concerns of Moms

Moms worry. Even before they become moms. From the minute they start thinking about whether they want to have a baby until long past the birth, moms worry.

Will my baby be healthy? Will I be a good mom? Can I dye my hair while pregnant? What can I eat?

The March of Dimes poll found that the number one thing moms worried about was birth defects – 78 percent said they were worried their child would be born less than perfect. Stress was moms’ second fear, with 74 percent answering that they were concerned if stress in their life would harm their baby’s health. Preterm birth was a close third with 71 percent saying they were worried their baby would be born too soon.

Surprisingly, only 70 percent thought about the fear of pain of childbirth and 55 percent were worried that they wouldn’t get to the hospital on time!

Other things moms worried about were:

  • 60 percent worried they wouldn’t be able to breastfeed successfully.
  • 59 percent worried about losing weight after pregnancy.
  • And, 59 percent worried about getting pregnant in the first place.
  • Sushi and fish was the number one food concern, with 61 percent concerned

 

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/sushi–breastfeeding-join-birth-defects–preterm-birth-as-leading-concerns-of-moms-78840487.html

No risk to 4 month old babies eating cereal-based foods, says EFSA

(see link for full story)

http://www.nutraingredients.com/Health-condition-categories/Maternal-infant-health/No-risk-to-4-month-old-babies-eating-cereal-based-foods-says-EFSA/?utm_source=Newsletter_Product&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Newsletter%2BProduct

More Muslim, Christian, and Sikh mothers stop breastfeeding early: study

Mothers may breastfeed their children two complete years for whoever wishes to complete the nursing [period]. Surah Al-Baqarah : 233

The Holy Quran is clear that the duration of breastfeeding of infants are for a period of two years. World Health Organization (WHO) and Government of India’s guidelines also suggest breastfeeding for a period of two years. Breast milk is an excellent source of nutrition and essential for the healthy growth of the child.

A latest study finds that a greater share of Muslim, Christian, and Sikh women breastfeed their young ones for less than two years. The study is done by Harvard School of Public Health of Boston, Massachusetts, USA and published in July 2008 issue of peer-reviewed journal Maternal & Child Nutrition.

Data analysis revealed that religion was an important factor in the likelihood of stopping breastfeeding. This likelihood was significantly higher for Muslims, Sikhs and Christian. In terms of adjusted ratio Muslim mothers are 10% more than Hindu mothers in stopping breastfeeding before their children have reached the age of 24 months, while this ratio is much higher for Christians (34%) and Sikhs (33%). Researchers made a note that there is nothing in these religion that will explain early termination of breastfeeding therefore it has to be cultural factors and norms.

http://twocircles.net/2009dec08/more_muslim_christian_and_sikh_mothers_stop_breastfeeding_early_study.html

Shunning the Family Bed. Who Benefits Most?

According to Dr. Jay Gordon, babies sleeping on a safe surface with sober, nonsmoking parents respond to their parents, and the parents respond to them. The chance of SIDS occurring in this situation are close to zero. Babies in a crib or in a room away from their parents, on the other hand, will breastfeed less and are at greater risk of infections, including life-threatening ones.

The medical profession, as it often does, is approaching the entire idea of the family bed backward. A baby in the same bed with his or her parents is surrounded by the best possible surveillance and safety system. It must be the responsibility of the manufacturers and proponents of cribs and separated sleep to prove that such disruption is safe, not the other way around.

Newborn babies breathe in irregular rhythms and even stop breathing for a few seconds at a time. To put it simply, they are not designed to sleep alone.

http://www.foodconsumer.org/newsite/Non-food/Lifestyle/shunning_the_family_bed_081220090712.html

‘We Go Into the Bush to Collect Herbs’

Tumba, the mother of three, could not explain what exclusive breast feeding is all about, neither has she seen reason for imbibing the practice, despite being told of its significance.

According to her, she was in the hospital for the first time after giving birth thrice, explaining that whenever she was pregnant, there were some elderly women around her that nursed her throughout the period of her pregnancy to delivery. For the three occasions she was in labour, there was never a time when she had experienced any difficulty or complication during or after labour.

Tumba added that she was only in the hospital for the antenatal care, after she was forced to visit the hospital by her relations whom she had just visited in Nafada town. She added that as soon as her husband comes down to fetch her, that would be the end of her visitation to the hospital.

“Going to health facilities for antenatal and medical treatment is only for the elite that live in the cities. In my case we only go into bush to collect herbs for our medication ,and that of our children”, Tumba stated.

When asked whether she has any knowledge about Exclusive Breastfeeding (EBF), Tumba said it was an abomination to give a baby the poisonous milk that comes immediately after delivery. To her, the first milk must be poured away before the newly born baby would be initiated to the mother’s breast, saying in keeping with her tradition, the first thing to be given to the new born baby should be water and nothing else.

Her words ” The first thing to be administered to a newly born child is feeding him with water. That is what I did to all my children and you can see them, they are still hale and hearty. So I don’t believe in giving breast milk as the first food after birth”.

To her, breastfeeding was placing the child on his mother’s breast to suck for a while, particularly, when the child indicated a sign of being hungry by persistently crying. He/she would be introduced to the breast and after the child stopped crying ,it indicated that the baby was satisfied. The child is put on breast milk only if he/she cries again.

She further argued that after three months of mixed breastfeeding with water, the child would be introduced to food, preparatory to the introduction of weaning (uprooting from breast milk) of the child. At six months the child would be fully introduced to food which called for his/her instant removal from the mother’s breast.

The chief Nursing officer cautioned nursing mothers against failure to introduce a newly born baby to the breast, debunking the notion that the first milk of the nursing mother was contaminated, and for that reason it should be poured away. Hajia Aisha argued that the first available milk after delivery contains colostrums, which is full of water and high concentration of nutrients that could not be obtained in any infant formula food. Therefore, this indicated the necessity of introducing the newly born baby to skin to skin breastfeeding, immediately after birth.

he added that the breastfeeding mother needs to sit in an upright position while placing her child on a breast, which is expected to last for about 15 to 20 minutes, before the child could be transferred to the other breast. By so doing the child would have sufficient time to suckle the necessary ingredients contained in the breast milk.This is contrary to the traditional practice that was characterized by indiscriminate placement and transfer of a child from one breast to another ,by the nursing mothers.

The nursing mothers will be taught how to prepare a pap full of protein, by fortifying the pap with Soya beans and groundnut formula, for the growth and development of the child.

http://allafrica.com/stories/200912070653.html

A Look Into Facebook’s Judicial System

What’s nudity? The policy enforcers at Facebook, a team of more than 100 spread out in offices around the world, including Northern California, London and Dublin, struggled with that question earlier this year. A legion of angry mothers revolted in response to the company removing photos of women breastfeeding.

The nudity policy, although not explicitly outlined, is pretty simple: no exposed nipples or nether regions. In a few cases, snap judgment during the so-called breastfeeding purge caused some fairly innocent pictures to get zapped.

But Barry Schnitt, Facebook’s director of policy communications, asserts that the company’s breastfeeding policy was largely misunderstood. The majority of the photos removed were of completely nude women (posing in mirrors or bathtubs) who happened to involve a baby eating lunch, Schnitt said.

Another misnomer is that the company was employing people to blindly click through pictures in search of breasts to flag for removal. “We only act on things that are reported to us,” Schnitt said during an interview at Facebook’s campus in Palo Alto. The vast majority of those reports come in the form of buttons throughout the site that users can click to highlight offensive content. So, if your au naturel pose gets zapped, blame a friend.

Facebook actually takes action on less than half of all reports.

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/technology/2009/12/facebook-ban.html

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Breastfeeding in the News: Nov. 13 – 20th, 2009

Hello All,

Anthropologists can be so distracting.  Last week I had a chance to hear both Sarah Hrdy (author of “Mothers and Others: The Evolutionary Origins of Mutual Understanding”) and James McKenna (author of “Sleeping with Your Baby”).  So instead of searching out the latests news on breastfeeding I kept finding myself thinking about the biological and cultural evolution of mothers and babies.  For millions of years babies have slept with their mothers.  Even primates that allow others to care for their babies during the day sleep with their babies at night. (Coincidently both Hrdy & McKenna started their careers studying monkeys!)  It has only been in the last 200 years (just since the Industrial Revolution) that we have stopped sleeping with our babies.  Think how short a time that is!  There is no way that the physiology of infants could evolve fast enough to cope with such a significant change.  It would be like expecting polar bears to adapt to palm trees at the North Pole twenty years from now. 

Now consider that in just the past 100 years we have gone from breastfeeding our babies to feeding our infants cow’s milk from a bottle.  And yet in this short amount of time our culture has so totally embraced formula feeding that any movement back towards breastfeeding is met with stern resistance.  In Australia women are reacting extrememly to the announcement that the government wants to make breastfeeding the norm.   “Whatever happened to choice? asks one columnist who insists that “This goes to the very core of a mother’s rights.”   

 “My nipples were red raw from breastfeeding and blood was dripping on to the carpet. Tears were falling on top of the splatters.  A midwife entered the room. Her advice for me was to “grin and bear it”.  Stories like these are offered as proof that women are being pressured into breastfeeding at the expense of their own well being. For a more balanced look at the choice between breastfeeding and formula read “Does Healthcare have anything to do with Health?” by Dr. Kimerer La Mothe  (If you have time to read only one story today this is the one I recommend.)  She says “Health is not given to us, it is created by us, as we use the information at our disposal to discover and grow the seeds of what our own bodily selves know.”  Here is her take on breastfeeding:

You must like nursing, people say. Well, yes and no. It’s not really about liking it. It’s about making the movements that allow me to be the mother, dancer, and philosopher I am and want to be. It’s about making the movements that will enable me to keep working, keep sleeping, keep the child napping, stay sane. It’s about managing the flow of thoughts and feelings, laundry and lunching. It’s about convenience and challenge, pleasure and well-being, time saved and spent. It’s about investing in an immune system and trusting in touch. It’s about figuring out what works, and having the faith and fortitude to honor it. It’s about health.”

While the mommy warriors attack each other about which is better breastmilk or formula, the formula companies continue to make money.  Shares in Mead Johnson have risen 89% since their Initial Public stock offering (IPO) last February.  “Bristol-Myers Squibb Co is to sell its 83 per cent holding in pediatric nutrition company Mead Johnson”  which will allow the company to be even more independent.  Goody for them.  Meanwhile the UN reports that almost 200 million children under the age of five have experienced “stunted growth” due in part to not exclusively breastfeeding for the first 6 months.  “Stunting is associated with developmental problems and is often impossible to correct,” a UNICEF statement said. “A child who is stunted is likely to experience a lifetime of poor health and underachievement.”  Here in the US formula companies are also being accused of marketing heavily to blacks who now have the lowest breastfeeding initiation rates and the highest rates of food allergies.

But before you despair the news isn’t all bad.  Happily in the list: “A to Z of what’s right with America” breastfeeding can be found under B.  And in British Columbia a public health nurse has convinced her city council to place breastfeeding welcome here decals in all the municipal buildings.  This should make it easier for private businesses to follow suit.  I’ve also included a report from mothers who tried breastfeeding in Disneyland.  One mother tells how she nursed while on the Haunted Mansion ride “although that part of the ride as you head into the cemetery where you’re turned around and heading backward was a little tricky”.  Another mother reports that while nursing at the official Disney Baby Care Center she felt “secluded and lonely”.  But I think Disney did the right thing by calling their center a “baby care” room rather than a “breastfeeding room/lounge”.  In Australia apparently some bottle feeding mothers feel resentful of breastfeeding rooms because they feel excluded. 

 Asiana Airlines has launched their “Hapy MomServices”.  “ …the airline has been providing exclusive check-in counters for mothers at the airport, breastfeeding covers and baby slings free of charge for travelers with babies.” I’m not sure how I feel about the breastfeeding cover ups, but free slings!  That’s terrific. They have even raised the age limit from 24 months to 36 months and they’re in 10 international airports!  Meanwhile back here in the states Sesame Street has been lauded for continuing to show their old Buffy St. Marie tape of her breastfeeding (the article includes a link to the clip) but somehow the  another clip from the 1980’s that included a brief breastfeeding segment now shows a baby being bottle fed. 

Over in the UK the NHS are now handing out instructions to dads on how to be a good father.  “Midwives see lots of fathers, but because they don’t fit into an NHS role – they are not the patient – they don’t have anything to give them.”  Becoming a father for a first time is apparently good for men as it makes them more motivated to improve their health.  (McKenna talked about a study which reported that having a baby lowered fathers testerone levels – but only if they were married!) This same article encouraged dads to support their partner’s efforts to breastfeed.   Too bad the young man from Saipan who beat his wife as she was breastfeeding didn’t get the same encouragement. 

In science news Dr Susan Love’s efforts to recruit one million people in breast cancer studies has allowed at least one breastfeeding researcher to speed up her work.  “Kathleen Arcaro, an environmental toxicologist at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, wants to analyze genetic changes in the breast tissue cells present in the milk samples from 250 women. She needed women who were currently breastfeeding and who needed a breast biopsy for a suspicious lump.  If her team had sought women through the normal channels — such as doctor’s offices and breastfeeding support groups, the project would have been too costly. But she has now enrolled 144 women, 80% of whom came from the Army of Women. “In less than a year, we’ve processed [samples from] 93 women in a study that people said we wouldn’t be able to do,” she says.  A study in the International Breastfeeding Journal reports that variations in mother’s breasts (specifically nipples) can affect weight gain.  While a study on pacifiers done in Argentina “concluded that pacifier use does not alter the prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding at 3 months of age among infants born at term who had successful breastfeeding established at 2 weeks of life.

There are a few more miscellaneous articles included below.  (Nicole Kidman inists she wouldn’t have gotten her last movie role if her breast were still at their pre-breastfeeding size.) In “Needling Worry: Why are we so crazy when it comes to vaccines?”  the author compares our growing concern about vaccines to our passionate defense of breastfeeding.  “I think the anxiety about vaccines and breastfeeding is about seeking a false sense of control,” said Kiki Schaffer, director of the Parenting & Family Center at the 14th Street Y in Manhattan. “You can’t be anxious about everything, because it’s too much, so you pick a few manageable things to get really, really upset about. A few years ago it was asbestos, then alar in apples. But picking one or two things feels safer than having anxiety about the whole world.” And I think part of making your choice about what to get worked up about involves slamming the choices of others. Because what if they’re right? What if you’re the one who’s screwed up when it comes to your kid? Nothing could be more horrible to contemplate”. 

 That is certainly food for thought.  Although for lactivists such as myself one could also argue that it is easier to effect real change if you narrow your focus.  Next week I will be speaking to a group of businesses in a teleconference hosted by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health.  Hopefully my crazy belief that breastfeeding mothers should be supported in the workplace will not only be heard, but will be acted on as well.

 Have a good week everyone, and thanks to everyone who sent me birthday greetings on Facebook.  You really made my day! 

Kathy Abbott, IBCLC 

www.BusyMomsBreastfeed.com

On Facebook: “Breastfeeding in the News” 

My Blog:  http://TheCuriousLactivist.wordpress.com/

 Do Pacifiers Interfere With Breastfeeding Success? William T. Basco, Jr., MD

Study Summary

One of the World Health Organization’s recommended best practices for assuring successful breastfeeding is for nursing mothers to use no artificial nipples or pacifiers with newborn infants who are breastfeeding. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends waiting to introduce pacifiers until infants are at least 1 month old. Data are mixed on whether pacifier use affects breastfeeding. Observational studies suggest that pacifier use has a negative effect on nursing success, but randomized trials in developed countries suggest either no effect of pacifiers on nursing success, or reduced nursing success only with very early pacifier introduction.

This study sought to evaluate the effect of pacifier use on breastfeeding success in infants up to 3 months of age — a longer period than has been assessed in previous studies. Participants were enrolled at 5 tertiary care centers in Argentina, which were a mixture of public and private institutions….

In 2005 and 2006, 1021 infants were enrolled (528 assigned to pacifier use group). The groups were virtually identical on pre-enrollment characteristics, including birth weight, rate of cesarean section, maternal age, previous breastfeeding by the mothers, maternal education and smoking status, and percentage with fathers in the home. Approximately 95% of the subjects in both groups completed the trial.

The prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding at 3 months of age was 85.8% in the pacifier group and 86.2% in the no-pacifier group, for a risk difference of 0.4%, (95% confidence interval -4.7% to 4%) In both groups, > 75% of the mothers were exclusively breastfeeding their study infants at 4 months. The rates of “any breastfeeding” were also virtually identical and remained > 97% for both groups through the 3 and 4 month assessments. Of note, only 67% of the infants in the pacifier use group actually used a pacifier, but 40% of the infants in the no-pacifier group also used a pacifier. The investigators concluded that pacifier use does not alter the prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding at 3 months of age among infants born at term who had successful breastfeeding established at 2 weeks of life.

Viewpoint

The study authors noted that because previous trials enrolled fewer participants or followed infants for shorter periods, this study adds a great deal to the literature around this question. Although the investigators caution that this was a highly selected population (motivated mothers and infants who had established successful early nursing), such women likely constitute large percentages of the population at many US maternity hospitals. These data strike me as highly useful and practical when offering advice to expecting or new mothers on “what to do about pacifiers?” Coupled with data on decreased risk for sudden infant death syndrome with pacifier use,[1] these new data should reassure both moms and pediatric providers that pacifier use is not harmful and may, in some scenarios, be beneficial.

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/711283

Bossy breastfeeding mums pressure bottle feeders, real mums survey finds (Australia)

A VOCAL minority of breastfeeding mums look down on those who bottle feed.  

A http://www.realmums. com.au survey of 466 women found some mothers who bottle-feed were made to feel inadequate by the pressure.

But it found while almost half the breastfeeding mothers (43.5 per cent) felt uncomfortable feeding in public, 98 per cent of the comments made to them were positive.

Real Mums founder Amanda Cox was disappointed to discover that bottle-feeding mums often put themselves down “big time”.

One was even told she could not use the parents’ room as they were for “breastfeeding mums only” and several were verbally attacked in public. But Ms Cox said these bad experiences were in the minority. She said while breastfeeding was great, women should not be judged if they could not physically or mentally do it.

“A few bottle-feeders also felt awkward, ashamed or as though they were judged,” she said. “The sad thing was the way they spoke about themselves in relation to their inability to breast-feed.”

Health ministers last week agreed babies should be breast-fed for the first six months.

The Real Mums survey found more than nine in 10 mothers had breast-fed in public and more than one in three had bottle-fed in public. The biggest concern of breastfeeding mothers was a wriggly baby who pulled away.

“They did feel uncomfortable when first attempting breastfeeding in public, but once they got the hang of it, they were mostly OK,” the survey found.

Almost all negative comments in public were directed at bottle- feeding mothers.

A small percentage of breastfeeders referred to things such as the “poison” of formula and made disparaging remarks about bottle-feedsing even though they weren’t asked.

“While some breastfeeding mums were seriously sanctimonious, and some bottle-feeding mums were seriously self-denigrating, the number was few, which is nice,” Ms Cox said.

“And breastfeeding mums did appear to be just a wee bit – OK, a lot – paranoid when it came to feeding in public.

“Most (were) more worried about what people might be thinking, not what was actually happening.”

“The bit we liked most, however, was … that of those that did have someone comment, they were positive comments.”

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/lifestyle/health-science/bossy-breastfeeding-mums-pressure-bottle-feeders-real-mums-survey-finds/story-e6frfhjf-1225799955987

Breastfeeding with benefits

“I thankfully was told about the group from my doctor, because I had no idea what La Leche League was before then,” she said. “It’s important to have breast-feeding services in a community, and we get referrals of moms from Royal Victoria Hospital. But a lot of mom’s still don’t know anything about our groups.”

To help spread the word, the La Leche League Barrie groups are holding a breastfeeding benefits family fun fair and silent auction fundraiser on Saturday at Ferris Lane Community Church (49 Ferris Ln.) from 10 a. m. to 1 p. m. Admission at the door is $3 per person, or $10 per family.  The event offers something for every family, including a silent auction, activities for children and tasty treats to nibble on courtesy of The Italian Bakery in Barrie.

 

http://www.thebarrieexaminer.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=2184558

An idea that is Hazardous to Your Health

Does “healthcare” have anything to do with “health”?

Kimerer LaMothe, Ph.D.

At the end of last week an article on breastfeeding caught my eye. Apparently, some celebrities have recently boasted about breastfeeding’s bulge-burning benefits. The article offered a response, amassing anecdotes from Every Woman for and against, asking: Is it true?

On the one hand, as someone who might qualify for professional nurser status, I warmed to the article’s positive pose. Mother of five, I have nursed for a total of over ten years—a full quarter of my life—and haven’t stopped yet. It works for me, for my kids, for our family.

On the other hand, however, the article made me shudder, and not (just) because it appeared in a fashion segment focused on fat. Left intact and even reinforced by the discussion was the greatest obstacle there is to any women figuring out for herself what strategies for nurturing her child will work for her: the idea that her body is a thing. This idea is hazardous to our health.

While no one came out and said, my body is a thing, the discussion assumed that a maternal body is a material entity subject to rules that apply in most cases. Is breastfeeding-to-lose such a rule? Women interviewed in the article and those who responded to it lined up for and against the rule based on their experiences. Those for whom it was true expressed delight that their bodies worked as they should. Those for whom it wasn’t were resigned or resentful or rebellious, blaming their bodies, or citing variables that interfered with the rule’s effect (like metabolism, not enough sleep, or inadequate exercise). 

However, the point to take home is not the truism that every woman is unique. The unsung point concerns the nature of health itself. Health is whole. What is healthy for us is something we must work out for ourselves in the context of the relationships that sustain us. Health is not given to us, it is created by us, as we use the information at our disposal to discover and grow the seeds of what our own bodily selves know.

Health, in this sense, is both the ability to know what is good for us, and the willingness to align our thoughts and actions with that knowledge. To have it, we need to cultivate it in our sensory selves and for our sensory selves every day—even and especially when figuring out how best to nurture a child.
*
This “health” is absent from current “healthcare” debates as well. Health is not what we get when we secure cheap drugs, insurance policies, or the right diet and exercise plan.

Even so-called “preventative medicine” is not about health. It is about monitoring a few variables that scientists know how to measure, marking them as “indicators,” and then prescribing drugs or behavior modifications designed to keep our numbers within a specified range. It is about identifying and managing risks based on statistics gathered over other times, places, and persons. 

Little in our contemporary approach to healthcare is about helping us learn for ourselves how to discern for ourselves what is good for us. We are told what is good for us and advised to implement it, for our own good. The assumption is that we don’t know. 

Yet, the fact is that no stack of statistics can deliver the most important piece of information you need for your ongoing health: which dot on the curve is you? No one can tell you what you most need to know: what works to enhance your health?
*
Our bodies are not things. Our bodies are movement—movement that is constantly registering sensations of pain and pleasure designed to guide us in making choices that align with our best health. 

Yet this capacity for knowing what is best for us remains a mere potential unless we develop it. Specifically, we need to learn to welcome, work with, and refine our sensations of pain and pleasure, so that our sensory selves can become surer guides.

Support in doing this kind of work is what mothers—as well as those concerned with health—need.
*
You must like nursing, people say. Well, yes and no. It’s not really about liking it. It’s about making the movements that allow me to be the mother, dancer, and philosopher I am and want to be. It’s about making the movements that will enable me to keep working, keep sleeping, keep the child napping, stay sane. It’s about managing the flow of thoughts and feelings, laundry and lunching. It’s about convenience and challenge, pleasure and well-being, time saved and spent. It’s about investing in an immune system and trusting in touch. It’s about figuring out what works, and having the faith and fortitude to honor it. It’s about health.

There is no way to measure the complexity of variables that make breastfeeding right for me, and thus no way for me to assume its rightness for anyone else.

 

Our health is something we cultivate through practices of attention to our own bodily selves. But we cannot begin to do so until we stop looking outside of ourselves for the rule that applies to our bodies, and start welcoming whatever information and stories come to us, not as grounds for judging ourselves, but as vital resources for helping us explore the movements we can make towards our own health. It’s what our bodies know.

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/what-body-knows/200911/idea-is-hazardous-your-health

Huge numbers of stunted children, says UN report

Almost 200 million children under the age of five in the developing world suffer from stunted growth, according to a new U.N. report. But surprisingly, in the Middle East, wealthier countries have more of a problem than some poorer nations.

The Occupied Palestinian Territories, for example, have a stunting prevalence of 10 percent — the lowest in the Middle East — according to the study from UNICEF, the New York-based United Nations Children’s Fund.

Oil-rich Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, both much wealthier nations, had significantly higher rates of stunting prevalence — 20 and 17 percent respectively.

Yemen had the highest rate of stunting prevalence in the Middle East — a staggering 58 percent — meaning more than half of all Yemeni children under five were significantly short for their age.

“High income from oil doesn’t mean the general population is benefitting from it,” said Arnold Timmer, senior adviser on nutrition for UNICEF, when asked about the findings.

Economic development is generally good news for nutrition and for human development,” Timmer told CNN. “But what children and mothers eat is not driven by economic indicators, but also by diet preferences, what’s available and what’s culturally trendy.” Timmer said food choice is a particular problem in the Middle East. “Instead of exclusively breast milk, the children might be getting a porridge of milk and butter and sugar that doesn’t have any vitamins and minerals in it,” Timmer said, “or tea.”

Timmer said tea is not recommended for young children because it can inhibit the absorption of iron, causing anemia.

Stunting, or low height for age, is caused by undernutrition, the U.N. said. “Stunting is associated with developmental problems and is often impossible to correct,” a UNICEF statement said. “A child who is stunted is likely to experience a lifetime of poor health and underachievement.”

The report, entitled “Tracking Progress on Child and Maternal Behavior,” said the 1,000 days from conception until a child’s second birthday are the most critical for development.

Stunting is a greater problem than being underweight or wasting, the U.N. report said. Most countries have much higher stunting rates than underweight rates, it said. In some countries, like Afghanistan, Yemen, Guatemala and Ethiopia, more than half of all children under five years old are stunted.

The U.N. defines stunting as height for age minus two standard deviations from the median height for that age. Wasting is defined as weight for height minus two standard deviations from the median weight for height for that age.

The bulk of the world’s undernutrition problem is localized, with 24 countries accounting for more than 80 percent of the world’s stunting. More than 90 percent of the developing world’s stunted children live in Africa and Asia. Although India is the country with the highest number of stunted children, it does not have the highest prevalence of stunting, due to its large population. Afghanistan has the highest prevalence of stunting of any country, with a whopping 59 percent.

The report recommends that of all the proven interventions, exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life — together with nutritionally adequate food from six months onwards — can significantly impact stunting.

Progress has been made in both Asia and Africa on stunting, the report said. In Asia, the prevalence of stunting dropped from about 44 percent in 1990 to 30 percent in 2008. In Africa, it fell from around 38 percent to an estimated 34 percent over the same period.

But the children’s agency warns much more needs to be done.

http://www.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/meast/11/19/stunting/

Breastfeeding at Disneyland

Many of us have taken our infants to Disney theme parks. This week we discuss babies at theme parks. All of our contributors this week had their experiences at Disneyland as present:

Mary writes:  That child nursed not only on the train around the park, but on Pirates of the Caribbean, “it’s a small world,” Storybook Land Canal Boats, Monorail, Jungle Cruise, Mark Twain, and, my favorite, the Haunted Mansion (although that part of the ride as you head into the cemetery where you’re turned around and heading backward was a little tricky).

For moms who feel that they need privacy, the Baby Care Center on Main Street at Disneyland offers a lovely quiet room with rockers, where moms and babies can go to enjoy a comfortable place away from onlookers. On a hot day, this place is a blessing.

Adrienne writes _ Many people know about the Baby Care Centers in the Parks. I nursed in a Baby Care Center once—and never again. I know that many women prefer a quiet, dark place to calm and feed their babies. In fact, I have often clarified that the feeding area in the Baby Care Center is available not just for breastfeeding but for bottle-feeding as well. The Baby Care Center feeding area can be a great resource for parents who want it.

That said, I felt secluded and lonely in the Baby Care Center. There are many “magical” aspects to breastfeeding, but not every feeding is a soft-lens angelic mother and child moment worthy of a poster in an OB/GYN’s office. I had plenty of quiet time at home with my baby. During our leisure time at Disneyland, I wanted to spend time with my family and friends—and I would like to think that they enjoyed their time with me as well! The magic in Disneyland and breastfeeding was that I could comfortably feed my son while I enjoyed time with my family and friends!

http://www.mouseplanet.com/9055/Breastfeeding_at_Disneyland

Breastfeeding decals planned  (Prince George, BC)

The city’s buildings could soon be sporting window decals that tells mothers they’re welcome to breastfeed in public places.
Pending approval from city council, the decals, which state that “healthy communities support breastfeeding anytime, anywhere,” will be placed in all civic facilities and city hall.
In September, Northern Health public health nurse Jessica Madrid encouraged city council to take the step, noting that about 80 per cent of mothers start off breastfeeding but the rate plummets following discharge from the hospital to 55 per cent after two months, 35 per cent after four months and 20 per cent after six months.
“We need a champion to help us promote breast feeding anytime, anywhere,” Madrid told council in a presentation. The window decals promote the “social marketing of breastfeeding as the cultural norm.
Cost of the decals, which staff said are easy to affix and remove, will be covered entirely by the Children First Initiative and the roll-out campaign will include additional information on how to support breastfeeding mothers and their children.
Madrid sees placing the decals in municipal buildings as a starting point from which she hopes to see them eventually show up on the windows and doors of city businesses

http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/20091116999915612/local/news/breastfeeding-decals-planned.html

Fatherhood: It’s Good for You

Most people wouldn’t see being a dad as a health issue, but apparently it is.

Upon becoming a father for the first time, many men discover a new meaning to life. Positive life changes usually follow, including quitting smoking and drinking, driving more carefully, eating better, getting more exercise and learning how to manage stress. Men who are actively involved in the lives of their children tend to be healthier, have more fulfilling marriages and careers and tend to live longer.

Support Breastfeeding. Ideally, your baby should have nothing but breast milk for the first six months. But nursing is sometimes hard for new moms. Make sure your partner gets plenty of fluids and rest, and encourage her every way you can.

http://www.baltimoresun.com/health/sns-health-fatherhood-good-for-you,0,1595194.story

Food Allergies on the Rise for US Children

The number of children with food allergies has increased 18% in the past ten years according to new research by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In addition, those seeking treatment at hospitals and clinics for food allergy related symptoms have tripled since 1993.

Race seemed to be a factor, but not gender. Black children were about twice as likely as white children to have a peanut or milk allergy. Hispanic children have the lowest overall incidence of food allergies, but the greatest increase over the past 10 years. There were no significant differences in allergy rates between boys and girls.

 

Theories for the rise in allergic reactions to food range from “the hygiene hypothesis”, where over-sanitization of the environment has lead to immune system insufficiency in children. Another theory is the lower rate of breastfeeding in some demographic groups, which is thought to be protective against the development of food allergies.

http://www.emaxhealth.com/1506/50/34483/food-allergies-rise-us-children.html

Nicole Kidman says breastfeeding helped her get parts that called for curves.
Nicole Kidman isn’t coy about these baby bumps. The Oscar-winning actress better known for meaty roles than actual curves suddenly filled out after she began breastfeeding her baby daughter, Sunday Rose, last summer. “They’re not very big, my boobs, so they just became normal size. I loved it!” she titters in the December/January issue of Ladies’ Home Journal. “I felt very Woman. When you’ve had a slightly androgynous body your whole life, having breasts is a nice feeling.”

…her bigger bosom is what clinched her role as a sultry beauty in the upcoming musical “Nine” starring Daniel Day-Lewis. “[I had] big boobs because I was breast feeding – I was perfect for it,” she says. “I wouldn’t get cast now.”

“I was not looking to go back to work,” she admits. “I went back to work because this was . . . the perfect kind of scenario. Part of me was nervous about going back to work . . . but they said I could bring my baby to the set, and Rob didn’t seem to find a problem at all, so then I was like, ‘Uh, this is heaven.”

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/movies/2009/11/16/2009-11-16_nicole_kidman_says_breastfeeding_helped_her_get_parts_that_called_for_curves.html

Man allegedly beats up wife as she’s breastfeeding their baby (Saipan Tribune)

A 27-year-old man is facing charges in court after he allegedly beat up his common-law wife while she was breastfeeding their baby.

Once they got home at 3am, Ilo accused his wife of having an affair with a family member. Ilo then allegedly threw a can of beer, hitting the victim on the forehead. Later, as the victim was breastfeeding their baby, Ilo allegedly punched her several times, pushed her to the wall, pulled her hair, and threatened to kill her with a machete.

http://www.saipantribune.com/newsstory.aspx?newsID=95115&cat=1

Breastfeeding – The Feedgood factor

New mums and mums-to-be in Ayrshire and Arran can get the feedgood factor when they choose to breastfeed their babies.

http://www.cumnockchronicle.com/news/roundup/articles/2009/11/15/394086-breastfeeding-045-the-feedgood-factor/

Needling Worry

Why are we so crazy when it comes to vaccines?

CREDIT: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

I’ve been writing about parenting for eight years. And for eight years I’ve joked that if you want to make readers crazy, you only need two words: “vaccines” and “breastfeeding.”

Back in the day, of course, we just wanted our kids to survive childhood. I once wrote a piece for the Forward theorizing about why Judaism historically didn’t address stillbirth or miscarriage. Why weren’t babies who lived less than 30 days given funerals? Why weren’t they attended with the rituals associated with mourning? I’m guessing it’s because attitudes were different in a time when an infant’s death was a regular occurrence. It was better to move on, push past grief, plan for the next kid. Today we have the luxury of neurosis. We get to dwell. We have fewer kids, and we not only expect them to survive to adulthood, we expect them to go to Yale and become gastroenterologists and program our TiVos. We get worked up about vaccines and breastfeeding because we can.

Meanwhile, I wave around studies showing that once researchers correct for maternal age, income, smoking, intelligence, and education levels, the evidence is inconclusive about whether breastfeeding is better than bottle-feeding with modern formula—but lactivists continue to hurl insults at bottle-feeders and insist they’re harming their children and society. Why do we talk such different languages, at such cross-purposes?

So why the passion? I think it’s because we’re terrified of an unknowable future. Parenting is about making choices—how to feed a newborn, whether to work or stay home (if you’re an upper-middle class Jewess who is fortunate enough to have that choice), whether to vaccinate.

“I think the anxiety about vaccines and breastfeeding is about seeking a false sense of control,” said Kiki Schaffer, director of the Parenting & Family Center at the 14th Street Y in Manhattan. “You can’t be anxious about everything, because it’s too much, so you pick a few manageable things to get really, really upset about. A few years ago it was asbestos, then alar in apples. But picking one or two things feels safer than having anxiety about the whole world.” And I think part of making your choice about what to get worked up about involves slamming the choices of others. Because what if they’re right? What if you’re the one who’s screwed up when it comes to your kid? Nothing could be more horrible to contemplate. Better to close your eyes and go on the attack. At this point, the notion of kids dying of old-school diseases seems far more remote than the notion of your specific kid getting autism or an immune disorder. We don’t know any kids with rubella. We know lots of kids with autism.

 

All I know is that judgmental eye-rolling doesn’t help anyone. Not kids, and not parents.

http://www.tabletmag.com/life-and-religion/20492/needling-worry/

The effect of maternal breast variations on neonatal weight gain in the first seven days of life

Background

This study aims to examine whether specific maternal breast variations (such as flat nipple, inverted nipple, large breast or/and large nipple) are barriers for weight gain in breastfed infants during the first seven days of life.

Conclusion

Breast variation among first-time mothers acts as an important barrier to weight gain among breastfed neonates in the early days of life. Health professionals need skills in the management of breastfeeding among mothers with the specified breast variations, so that mothers are given appropriate advice on how to breastfeed and overcome these problems.

http://www.internationalbreastfeedingjournal.com/content/4/1/13

Infant formula maker spun off from parent company

Biopharmaceutical company Bristol-Myers Squibb Co is to sell its 83 per cent holding in pediatric nutrition company Mead Johnson which produces Enfamil infant formula.

Stephen Golsby, Mead Johnson’s chief executive officer said: “This transaction represents the important final step in our journey to be a fully independent public company. We believe the decision to split-off Mead Johnson reflects confidence in the success of our growth strategy and our strong financial performance since our IPO (initial public stock offering) in February, as well as BMS’ objective to focus on their core BioPharma business.”

Pediatric nutrition

Mead Johnson develops, manufactures, markets and distributes nutritional brands in 50 countries worldwide. The company claims its Enfa group of brands, including Enfamil(R) infant formula, is the world’s leading brand franchise in pediatric nutrition. In addition to baby formulas, including Enfamil that generated 61 per cent of the company’s revenue of $2.88bn last year, the company sells nutritional supplements for pregnant and nursing women, and people with metabolism problems.

James Cornelius, chairman and chief executive officer of Bristol-Myers Squibb, said: ““Now is the right time to move forward with a split-off, given the excellent performance of Mead Johnson since the IPO earlier this year and our confidence in the current and future performance of our biopharmaceuticals business.

Divestment strategy

By executing our healthcare divestment strategy, we have sharpened our BioPharma focus, improved the overall financial strength of the company and supported our ability to pursue strategic business development opportunities. All of these actions help us fulfill our mission to discover, develop and deliver innovative medicines to help patients prevail over serious diseases,” said Cornelius.  Shareholders in his company will receive $1.11 of Mead Johnson stock for each $1.00 tendered in Bristol-Myers shares.

Mead Johnson shares have risen 89 per cent since the stock’s first public sale last February.

http://www.nutraingredients-usa.com/Industry/Infant-formula-maker-spun-off-from-parent-company/?c=ei8s7T8XuY7wpEkEwhQbwg%3D%3D&utm_source=newsletter_weekly&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Newsletter%2BWeekly

Sesame Street turns 40: Segments promote breastfeeding over the years

Recently, Sesame Street expanded its focus on healthful living with exercise and good eating habits.  But in actuality, the program has been promoting healthy eating for babies since its inception, depicting breastfeeding and breastmilk as the normal, natural way to feed infants and drawing praise from members of the attachment parenting community for years.

One well-known clip from 1977 features a mother named Buffy and her infant son, Cody.  While she nurses her baby, Buffy explains to Big Bird why some mothers feed their babies at their breast.  “He likes it because it’s nice and warm and sweet and natural; it’s good for him.  And I get to hug him while I do it!” 

Some controversy exists over this next clip, which highlights video segments of parents and their babies set to the song “You’re My Baby” written and performed by Sesame Street‘s musical director, Joe Raposo.  The original clip (see below) was aired in the mid-1980s and briefly shows a mother breastfeeding her baby at approximately the 1:10 mark.  This segment was updated for the 21st century and, sadly, the breastfeeding clip was replaced with that of a baby being bottle-fed

If you would like to see Sesame Street advocate for breastfeeding in future episodes, contact the show’s production company, Sesame Workshop, via a short submission form located on their website.

http://www.examiner.com/x-29156-Minneapolis-Breastfeeding-Examiner~y2009m11d14-Sesame-Street-turns-40-Segments-promote-breastfeeding-over-the-years

NHS launches pocket ‘how to be a dad’ guide to fatherhood

Every new dad is to be handed a pocket guide offering advice on how to be a good parent.

The credit card-sized guide will provide tips on parenting and details on where to go for help.

It will be handed out to fathers attending the birth of their child and direct them to advice on subjects such as breastfeeding and paternity leave.

Duncan Fisher, of the card’s developers DadInfo, who will debate the role of fathers in childbirth at the Royal College of Midwives conference later this month, said: “Midwives see lots of fathers, but because they don’t fit into an NHS role – they are not the patient – they don’t have anything to give them.”

Among the tips given is the suggestion that the dad’s role at the birs to “help provide a loving and calm environment” and a warning that fathers can get depressed after the birth, “especially if your partner’s feeling low”.

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/top-stories/2009/11/15/how-to-be-a-dad-card-115875-21822735/

A to Z of what’s right with America – the list.

A is for Alternative medicine – Although the Associated Press hasn’t figured it out yet, alternative medicine is cheaper, safer and more effective than pharmaceuticals and surgery.

B is for Breastfeeding – Because the best milk is mother’s milk.

C is for the Constitution – Without it, this website wouldn’t even exist and free speech would be stifled.

D is for Democracy – Despite all its shortcomings, Democracy is still the best form of government the world has come up with.

http://www.naturalnews.com/027492_America_A-to-Z.html

Give mums a break (Australia)

WOMEN do not need politicians telling them about the importance of breastfeeding. They do not need a bunch of bureaucrats demanding that they breastfeed their babies for six months.

What they could do with is a bit more access to services and support, not lectures that make them feel inadequate.  But as always, governments find it much easier to browbeat and pontificate than actually provide the ground-level assistance that taxpayers really need. Health ministers want a National Breastfeeding Strategy introduced next year to promote, protect, support and value breastfeeding so that it is viewed as the biological and social norm.

That might sound lovely, but what of the many mothers who find breastfeeding almost impossible for physical or economic reasons? Won’t such a campaign just make them feel so much worse? This goes to the very core of a mother’s rights.

Read in today’s Sunday Herald Sun our exclusive survey of new mothers and you will hear many felt “pressured” into breastfeeding even though they found it difficult. The mothers said they were given different advice by midwives, leaving them confused, distressed and frustrated. One was even told that giving formula to her newborn was like feeding it McDonald’s, another said that hospital staff treated her like a criminal for giving her baby a top-up formula feed.

Whatever happened to choice?

I support a woman’s right to choose and believe breast is best. However, we are overlooking the very simple fact that some women can’t or do not want to breastfeed. In an ideal world, where a mothers can choose and afford to stay at home and where breastfeeding comes easily, no doubt more would breastfeed. But new mothers are under enough pressure to cope. Give them a break.

This national strategy is not the way to encourage breastfeeding. It is putting a wedge between mothers who do and those who do not.

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/opinion/give-mums-a-break/story-e6frfhqf-1225797718081

Breastfeeding just doesn’t work out for some mums  (Australia) 

There I was in a private room with no shirt on and no bra. I couldn’t. My nipples were red raw from breastfeeding and blood was dripping on to the carpet. Tears were falling on top of the splatters.  A midwife entered the room. Her advice for me was to “grin and bear it”. I was told to bite my lip for the first 10 seconds of every feed and the pain would gradually disappear.

As a first-time mum I was vulnerable and accepted her advice without question. After all, my comfort was secondary to giving my son the best start in life. My partner was a little less accepting. He asked the same midwife about introducing one bottle feed into the mix each day (one out of eight). She rolled her eyes and said: “A male would ask that question.”…

At their meeting in Adelaide on Friday, they signed off on a draft National Breastfeeding Strategy. The full five-year strategy will be finalised by the end of the year. Federal Health Minister Nicola Roxon says it’s needed because not enough Australian women are breastfeeding. She cited an Australian study from 2004 that claimed 92 per cent of newborns were being breastfed. After one week that dropped to 80 per cent. With every month there was a steady decline. By three months, it was down to 56 per cent and by six months it was 14 per cent. Australian women should be doing better, Roxon says.

I for one am offended. The vast majority of women are already doing the best they can. Why doesn’t the Government just butt out? By all means give women the information they need, but let them make their own choices for their own children and don’t make them feel bad if they fall short of the mark.

http://www.news.com.au/perthnow/story/0,21498,26349958-2761,00.html?from=public_rss

Mother banned from breastfeeding in pub

A mother has described how she was made to feel like a criminal after being ordered to stop breast-feeding in a pub.

Staff at the venue allegedly told Elizabeth Simpson, 28, to stop attending to her 10-week old daughter because customers were “eating their meals”.

“They said it was their policy not to have breastfeeding in the restaurant but there was no sign saying that.

“The fact that their main clientele seems to be young mothers shocked us even more,” she said. “It is absolutely ridiculous.

A Freemasons Arms spokesman said: “We’re disappointed to hear that one of our customers is unhappy with their recent visit.”

“We cater for lots of parents with young children and always aim to make their visit enjoyable as well as comfortable by providing baby changing facilities and high chairs.”

He added: “Breastfeeding in the pub is perfectly acceptable and our team is trained to offer support as and when requested.

“If this was not the case on this occasion then we sincerely apologise and hope the customer is willing to visit the pub again in the future.”

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/6561425/Mother-banned-from-breastfeeding-in-pub.html

Recruiting an Army of Women to fight breast cancer

Dr. Susan Love has a goal: Get 1 million people to enroll in breast cancer studies. She’s well on the way.

That’s why the Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation created the Army of Women, an Internet-based campaign aimed at connecting volunteers with breast cancer researchers. Set up in partnership with the Avon Foundation for Women and scientists, the Love/Avon Army of Women takes all of those who sign up online: healthy women, women with a breast cancer diagnosis, women of all ages, shapes and colors, and even men with breast cancer. Its goal is to recruit one million volunteers.

Kathleen Arcaro, an environmental toxicologist at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, wants to analyze genetic changes in the breast tissue cells present in the milk samples from 250 women. She needed women who were currently breastfeeding and who needed a breast biopsy for a suspicious lump.

If her team had sought women through the normal channels — such as doctor’s offices and breastfeeding support groups, the project would have been too costly. But she has now enrolled 144 women, 80% of whom came from the Army of Women. “In less than a year, we’ve processed [samples from] 93 women in a study that people said we wouldn’t be able to do,” she says.

http://www.latimes.com/features/health/la-he-army-of-women16-2009nov16,0,6031715.story

Packaging for pistol sight among items found in Fort Hood shooter’s apartment 

KILLEEN, Texas – Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan’s dingy apartment holds the odd remnants of a solitary military life, with hints of secrets and suggestions of terrible plans.

A folding card table near the kitchen was covered in white plastic and a random scattering of belongings. Some hinted of Hasan’s Arab roots and Islamic faith: a pile of Jordanian and Israeli coins, an Al Fajr-brand alarm clock and a white knit skull cap. Beside those items was a thin paperback book published in India in 1993, Dreams and Interpretations , by Allamah Muhammed Bin Sireen.

The book’s back cover declares it “a must in every Muslim home.” Its table of contents promises explanations for 900 dreams – everything from birth to breastfeeding, from seeing Allah to recognizing his messengers.

http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/news/texassouthwest/stories/DN-apartment_12ent.ART.State.Edition1.983b6c.html

More black women are breastfeeding, but less than other moms

A National Health and Nutrition Examination survey shows that breast-feeding rates increased significantly among black women from 36 percent in 1993-1994 to 65 percent in 2005-2006. However, the findings, released last year by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), also show that 80 percent of Mexican American and 79 percent of white infants were breast-fed during the same period.

And, despite an increase in lactation programs and consultants in hospitals, many health care professionals do not encourage black women to breast-feed. Barber also notes that heavy marketing by makers of infant formula also impacts some women’s decisions to breast-feed. However, black women who are educated, as well as those who have a supportive partner tend to breast-feed more, Barber says.

http://www.thegrio.com/2009/11/kathi-barber-recalls-watching-her.php

Asiana Airlines to Reinforce Mother-Friendly Services

Asiana’s mother-friendly services have been gaining enthusiastic reviews from those who have been through the ordeals of travelling with infants.

Through the recent launch of “Happy Mom Services,” the airline has been providing exclusive check-in counters for mothers at the airport, breastfeeding covers and baby slings free of charge for travelers with babies.

The service was initiated on Oct. 1 at 10 International airports (Incheon, New York, Los Angeles, Seattle, San Francisco, Chicago, London, Frankfurt, Paris and Sydney) to which Asiana flies. Out of 2,277 passengers traveling with infants, 1,043 passengers used the exclusive counters and 167 passengers were provided with breastfeeding covers, an Asiana spokesperson said.

In response to the enthusiastic reception, Asiana will extend the “Happy Mom Services” to 66 airports internationally. Also, they will lengthen the age limit from 24 months to 36 months old.

“I was worried about breastfeeding on board. But when arriving at JFK International Airport, I found that there was an exclusive counter for mothers run by Asiana and received a breastfeeding cover as well. During my 14-hour flight to Incheon, it was very pleasant for me to travel to Korea,” Choi Eun-sun, a passenger on the Nov. 13 Incheon OZ221 from New York to Incheon, said.

“No other airline has provided such services. This is really great for moms,” Agreda Sison Leizl, a passenger on the airline’s Oct. 29 flight from Chicago to Incheon, said.

Netizens have also shown their interest in the new services and currently 21 blogs and 10 internet cafes are talking about the “Happy Mom Services.”

The exclusive check-in counters for those with infants provide the 3E services ― Express Check In, Express Boarding and Express Baggage. It allows passengers with infants to shorten the waiting period at airports.

Passengers with infants will also receive a “Priority Tag” on their checked baggage. Arriving passengers with infants will now be able to quickly retrieve their baggage without the hassle of caring for their infant while waiting at baggage claim.

During long-haul flights, mothers have faced difficulties in feeding their infants. Usually, feeding takes place in the toilets or the galleries of aircraft. In order to resolve these difficulties, Asiana will provide breastfeeding covers for passengers when asked by request at the departure point.

For larger infants travelling on children tickets, Asiana is providing free installation of baby safety seats upon reservation. Asiana hopes the service will negate the need for passengers to bring along their own baby seats.

http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/nation/2009/11/119_55403.html

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Filed under breastfeeding, Breastfeeding in the News, the curious lactivist

Breastfeeding in the News: Aug. 11th – Aug. 17th, 2009

Hello all,

Not as many stories this week, but a lot to think about.  An evolutionary psychologist has come up with an interesting theory that mothers are hard-wired to go into a mourning period if breastfeeding does not follow delivery of a child” as an explanation for post partum depression.  “And it’s not just choosing formula over milk that may cause the separation. Hospitals’ policies of keeping newborns in nurseries may instigate a mourning process in new moms as well, regardless of how they feed their newborns.”  Immediately after that article you will see an interview with a British midwife who says “Following the birth of my second child, I was deeply affected by her puzzling inability to breastfeed. Subsequently, I found it very hard to bond closely with her as every bottle feed brought a sense of rejection.”   

A new study shows that breastfeeding reduces the risk of breast cancer for women with an immediate relative with breast cancer by 59%!  That’s wonderful news but I was also intrigued by another little tibit in this story. Mothers who took lactation suppression drugs (as opposed to those who neither breastfed nor used lactation suppressing drugs) also lowered their risk.    One group was protected via lactation while the other was protected by making sure the body never lactated. Hmm… I would certainly like to know more about this.

Nancy Terres sent me a response in a nursing journal (JOGNN – sorry there is no link to with it) about a study on the need to educate parents on the risks of bed sharing.  The long response (I’ve only posted a little snip of it) from Tom Johnston (a male IBCLC?? Good for him!) & Elizabeth Johnston was terrific (lots of data & great perspective) but of course it didn’t make a dent in the thinking of the original authors of the study.  But still it was wonderful to learn that there is some dialogue going on.

Norma Ritter tells me that the survey mentioned last week “in which mothers said that regardless of how they fed their own baby, many moms believe infant formula is a safe alternative to breast milk.  You might be interested to learn that this survey was conducted by a group called Mom’s Feeding Freedom.
http://www.momsfeedingfreedom.com/general/page/about-us  According to their website:  MomsFeedingFreedom.com was made possible by a grant from the International Formula Council. The opinions and views expressed on this web site are of Kate Kahn who independently manages and controls the editorial content contained on the web site. Their interpretation of government policy is somewhat, shall we say, inventive?  For example: did you know there are some government officials around the country, including in New York, Massachusetts and California, who are trying to withhold information and support from new moms who choose to bottle feed their babies? The campaign is promoted as an effort to ban the marketing of infant formula in hospitals. However, it really is an attack on women’s access to information to make a legitimate choice.”  Thanks Norma!

In other news the mom in Grand Forks did not get sent to jail for breastfeeding her baby while drunk (she did get sent to rehab) but unfortunately she has been arrested twice since that incident on other charges (like slashing tires out in the parking lot after being told she couldn’t see her baby).  There was a nurse-in at a Chick-o-Fil in Florida.  And there is a new breastfeeding friendly hospital discharge bag out on the market. 

And once again the dirty truth comes out about nipple shields.  Not only do they have to be washed constantly, it can take forever to wean from a shield, in this case five months (I once worked with a mom who was still using a nipple shield at three months – she hated it and the baby refused to nurse without it).  So if you know anyone who is still handing out nipples shields as a  “quick fix” please let them know the truth.  Unless you show the mom how to wean from the shield and follow up to make sure that she does, you are doing her no real favor.

Lastly a special thanks to Debra Berube Dwyer, Nicole Deggins, Rebecca Hains, Sharon Bo Abrams,  Norma Woolf Ritter, Ruth Lackie, and Nancy Terres for sharing your thoughts with me.  I loved hearing from you!

Kathy Abbott, IBCLC

www.BusyMomsBreastfeed.com

On Facebook: “Breastfeeding in the News”

My Blog:  http://TheCuriousLactivist.wordpress.com/

 

 

On Bed Sharing (from JOGNN)

Finally, we have to take issue with the assumption that it is incumbent upon us as health care professionals to continually educate new parents in regards to separate sleeping as ‘‘safe sleeping.’’ If 89% of respondents in this study reported knowing the ‘‘risks’’ of bed sharing, yet 72%reported engaging in that ‘‘risky behavior,’’ we can only come to one conclusion: parents know that many health care professionals believe that bed sharing is risky, but parents do not actually believe that we are telling the truth. In other words, they aren’t buying what we are selling. The problem, if you can call it that, is not the one of ignorance, it is the one in which nature and common sense tells parents that the ‘‘experts’’ are wrong.

Jarold (Tom) Johnston, CNM, IBCLC & Elizabeth A. Johnston, BSN

 

Response from authors: Our position was and is that new parents, in particular, should be informed that bedsharing has documented risks and that even if safety precautions are taken to try to practice safe bedsharing, the reality is that not all the risk factors can be readily addressed. Specifically, being overtired is virtually unavoidable for a new parent, and bedsharing is most likely to occur within the first 3 months after birth (during which time infants have limited mobility). These are two of the risk factors associated with bedsharing. We understand and respect that perspectives on the practice of bedsharing are polarized. However, our position and reason for the study was based on the increasing evidence that bedsharing has risks for young infants in particular. Despite the fact that this perspective may be controversial, we believe that parents should be informed of these risks.

 

Christine A. Ateah RN, PhD, and

Kathy J. Hamelin RN,MN

 

Is postpartum due to not breastfeeding?

Postpartum depression has been linked to choosing bottle feeding over breastfeeding, according to an evolutionary psychologist’s research.

The fields of evolutionary study goes beyond how birds got their wings. Evolutionary psychology, one subfield, tries to understand humanity’s instinctual actions based on a long view that goes back to our hunter-gatherer ancestors. And new moms, one new theory goes, may be hard-wired to go into a mourning period if breastfeeding does not follow delivery of a child.

Back then, there would be one main reason why a woman would deliver a baby and then not breastfeed: the baby had died. Untold generations of that, lead researcher Gordon Gallup posits in the August issue of Medical Hypotheses, may have imprinted a biological trigger of grief when that separation happened. It would even kick in when the baby was just fine.

This theory was tested in a small study, researchers noted. A group of about 50 mothers of 4- to 6-week-old infants were examined for postpartum depression. Age, income, relationship statues and education were not contributing factors in who was more likely to be clinically depressed. But breast or bottle was: breastfeeders were less likely to have the baby blues, as it’s sometimes derisively called.

And it’s not just choosing formula over milk that may cause the separation. Hospitals’ policies of keeping newborns in nurseries may instigate a mourning process in new moms as well, reagrdless of how they feed their newborns.

http://contemporarypediatrics.modernmedicine.com/contpeds/Child%20Behavior%20&%20Development%20Top%20Story/Is-postpartum-due-to-not-breastfeeding/ArticleStandard/Article/detail/619258?contextCategoryId=40137

Inside Medicine: Breastfeeding lead midwife

In a series focusing on medical specialties, the BBC News website meets Suzanne Barber, an infant-feeding adviser midwife.

Her speciality is helping mothers breastfeed their babies and deal with any problems they have.

My biggest challenge is when there is unintentional undermining of breastfeeding, from well-meaning others, by recommending supplementation with formula milk.

So often it is said that a baby is “starving” and “the mother hasn’t got enough milk” or “the milk isn’t good enough”.

It takes patience and sometimes courage to re-educate those who have unintentionally been given poor advice and education when they had their babies and to convince such mothers that the baby’s behaviour is normal and that the mother will be able to provide for all the baby’s nutritional needs.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS SPECIALITY?

Following the birth of my second child, I was deeply affected by her puzzling inability to breastfeed. Subsequently, I found it very hard to bond closely with her as every bottle feed brought a sense of rejection.

I have since been driven towards supporting others both in the teaching and promotion of practice, which maximises success in breastfeeding wherever possible.

 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/7635212.stm

Breastfeeding moms state ‘nurse-in’

Breastfeeding mothers had a “nurse-in” Friday at a fast-food restaurant in Orlando, Fla.

The protest was inspired by a woman who said an employee at the Chick-Fil-A had told her to cover her breast and offered her a towel as she fed her baby Florida law allows women to breastfeed almost anywhere at any time and specifically says the nipple does not need to be covered. The woman said she tried complaining to the manager and to Chick-Fil-A’s head office, but to no avail. The restaurant now says it’s educating employees about the breastfeeding law and considering door stickers to tell guests it’s a “mom-friendly” place

http://www.timesoftheinternet.com/101316.html

Grand Forks mother in drunken breast-feeding case arrested again

A Grand Forks mother who pleaded guilty in a case of breastfeeding while drunk has been arrested again, making it two times that she’s been locked up since her sentencing Friday on a child-neglect charge.

Friday night, just hours after her sentencing…Officers arrested her that night after receiving a complaint that she had slashed the tire of a pickup in the parking lot of her apartment building.

Friday, a state District Court judge allowed Anvarinia to serve at least part of a six-month sentence in a substance-abuse treatment facility, but she must complete the program to get credit for time served. She was also sentenced to three years of supervised probation. 

http://www.grandforksherald.com/event/article/id/129680/group/Local%20News/

More than 200 hospitals across the US to give out free breastfeeding discharge bags

soon more than 200 hospitals across the country will be giving out new breastfeeding discharge bags called the ‘Healthy Baby Bounty Bag’ to moms who want to breastfeed instead.

It is an insulated bag you can use to store pumped breast milk. Inside it has samples of products, coupons, and resources – all that can help breastfeeding mamas succeed plus a few other goodies.

In my bag was Lansinoh milk storage bags and disposable nursing pads, Boogie Wipes samples, SaniHands for Kids hand wipe samples, an Aquaphor sample, even some Traditional Medicinals Organic Mother’s Milk tea bags (my fav part!) and a card with a code to redeem a free gift from Cottonwood Kids.

http://www.examiner.com/x-608-Early-Childhood-Parenting-Examiner~y2009m8d10-More-than-200-hospitals-across-the-US-to-give-out-free-breastfeeding-discharge-bags

Breastfeeding 101: What the heck is a nipple shield? + information about other nursing supplies

My first born was a bit jaundice and therefore extremely lackadaisical about nursing. I.e. he was lazy. I was determined to breastfeed, and much to the horror of any true La Leche League Leader, the lactation specialist at the hospital gave me what she called a “nipple shield,” probably the most controversial breastfeeding aid on the market. 

 

A plastic shield that fits right over your nipple, it makes your breast more “user-friendly” and baby may just latch right on. My son sure did. It took me five months to wean him off the thing. (So not only was I washing my reusable nursing pads, I was constantly sanitizing the darn nipple shields.  At times I thought using formula would be less work.)

 

http://www.examiner.com/x-5177-Rochester-Parenting-Examiner~y2009m8d10-Breastfeeding-101–What-the-heck-is-a-nipple-shield–information-about-other-nursing-supplies

New York Times: Breast-Feeding Linked to Lower Cancer Risk

Although several studies have found that lactation is protective against breast cancer, the new report found little effect for premenopausal women over all. But for women with an immediate relative, like a mother or a sister, who had breast cancer, those who breast-fed had a 59 percent lower risk of premenopausal breast cancer. That is closer in line with the risk for women who had no disease in the family, the study found.

The new study, published in The Archives of Internal Medicine, used information from 60,075 participants in the second Harvard Nurses’ Health Study. More research is needed to replicate the findings and to show that the reduced risk is the result of breast-feeding, rather than some other factor common to women who breast-feed. But Dr. Stuebe suggested that breast-feeding may prove just as effective a strategy for high-risk women as the use of Tamoxifen, a drug that interferes with estrogen activity and is often used in high-risk women to reduce breast cancer risk.

Interestingly, women who took drugs to prevent the formation of milk were at lower risk for breast cancer than those who refrained from breast-feeding but did not use lactation-suppressing drugs, the study found.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/11/health/research/11cancer.html?_r=1

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